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Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation and Social Immortality ed. by Pascal Couderc and Kenneth Sillander (review)

Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation and Social Immortality ed. by Pascal Couderc... DOI: 10.1355/sj29-2n Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation and Social Immortality. Edited by Pascal Couderc and Kenneth Sillander. Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2012. 390 pp. Ancestors in Borneo Societies is a collection of essays that attempts to develop and redefine the study of ancestors in Borneo studies. Among anthropologists, this region is associated with the pioneering work of Robert Hertz on secondary mortuary rituals (Hertz [1907] 1960) and the practice of headhunting (Hoskins 1996). Although reforming the established scholarship of The Dark Side of Humanity (Parkin 1996) was an ambitious goal, Courdec and Sillander have brought together a comprehensive collection of papers framed by an original analytical concept — ancestorship. The book is composed of an introduction and eight chapters. Except for Oesterheld’s thematic discussion of the role of ancestors in the Dayak-Madurese conflict, each essay focuses on a single people. Their foci ranging from East Kalimantan to the southern part of Malaysian Borneo, the contributors provide rich ethnographic accounts collected among the Bentian, Benuaq, Uut Danum, Gerai, Iban and Melanau groups. The book also contains noteworthy illustrations and a detailed map for those unfamiliar with the region. A welcome addition would have been a glossary of indigenous terms http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation and Social Immortality ed. by Pascal Couderc and Kenneth Sillander (review)

Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation and Social Immortality ed. by Pascal Couderc and Kenneth Sillander (review)

Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia , Volume 29 (2) – Jul 17, 2014

Abstract

DOI: 10.1355/sj29-2n Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation and Social Immortality. Edited by Pascal Couderc and Kenneth Sillander. Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2012. 390 pp. Ancestors in Borneo Societies is a collection of essays that attempts to develop and redefine the study of ancestors in Borneo studies. Among anthropologists, this region is associated with the pioneering work of Robert Hertz on secondary mortuary rituals (Hertz [1907] 1960) and the practice of headhunting (Hoskins 1996). Although reforming the established scholarship of The Dark Side of Humanity (Parkin 1996) was an ambitious goal, Courdec and Sillander have brought together a comprehensive collection of papers framed by an original analytical concept — ancestorship. The book is composed of an introduction and eight chapters. Except for Oesterheld’s thematic discussion of the role of ancestors in the Dayak-Madurese conflict, each essay focuses on a single people. Their foci ranging from East Kalimantan to the southern part of Malaysian Borneo, the contributors provide rich ethnographic accounts collected among the Bentian, Benuaq, Uut Danum, Gerai, Iban and Melanau groups. The book also contains noteworthy illustrations and a detailed map for those unfamiliar with the region. A welcome addition would have been a glossary of indigenous terms

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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
ISSN
1793-2858
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Abstract

DOI: 10.1355/sj29-2n Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation and Social Immortality. Edited by Pascal Couderc and Kenneth Sillander. Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2012. 390 pp. Ancestors in Borneo Societies is a collection of essays that attempts to develop and redefine the study of ancestors in Borneo studies. Among anthropologists, this region is associated with the pioneering work of Robert Hertz on secondary mortuary rituals (Hertz [1907] 1960) and the practice of headhunting (Hoskins 1996). Although reforming the established scholarship of The Dark Side of Humanity (Parkin 1996) was an ambitious goal, Courdec and Sillander have brought together a comprehensive collection of papers framed by an original analytical concept — ancestorship. The book is composed of an introduction and eight chapters. Except for Oesterheld’s thematic discussion of the role of ancestors in the Dayak-Madurese conflict, each essay focuses on a single people. Their foci ranging from East Kalimantan to the southern part of Malaysian Borneo, the contributors provide rich ethnographic accounts collected among the Bentian, Benuaq, Uut Danum, Gerai, Iban and Melanau groups. The book also contains noteworthy illustrations and a detailed map for those unfamiliar with the region. A welcome addition would have been a glossary of indigenous terms

Journal

Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast AsiaInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Jul 17, 2014

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