Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process

How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process People make three general types of judgments to express importance, preference, or likelihood and use them to choose the best among alternatives in the presence of environmental, social, political, and other influences. They base these judgments on knowledge in memory or from analyzing benefits, costs, and risks. From past knowledge, we sometimes can develop standards of excellence and poorness and use them to rate the alternatives one at a time. This is useful in such repetitive situations as student admissions and salary raises that must conform with established norms. Without norms one compares alternatives instead of rating them. Comparisons must fall in an admissible range of consistency. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) includes both the rating and comparison methods. Rationality requires developing a reliable hierarchic structure or feedback network that includes criteria of various types of influence, stakeholders, and decision alternatives to determine the best choice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interfaces INFORMS

How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process

Interfaces , Volume 24 (6): 25 – Dec 1, 1994
25 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/informs/how-to-make-a-decision-the-analytic-hierarchy-process-ug1A9WAz6c

References (20)

Publisher
INFORMS
Copyright
Copyright © INFORMS
Subject
Research Article
ISSN
0092-2102
eISSN
1526-551X
DOI
10.1287/inte.24.6.19
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

People make three general types of judgments to express importance, preference, or likelihood and use them to choose the best among alternatives in the presence of environmental, social, political, and other influences. They base these judgments on knowledge in memory or from analyzing benefits, costs, and risks. From past knowledge, we sometimes can develop standards of excellence and poorness and use them to rate the alternatives one at a time. This is useful in such repetitive situations as student admissions and salary raises that must conform with established norms. Without norms one compares alternatives instead of rating them. Comparisons must fall in an admissible range of consistency. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) includes both the rating and comparison methods. Rationality requires developing a reliable hierarchic structure or feedback network that includes criteria of various types of influence, stakeholders, and decision alternatives to determine the best choice.

Journal

InterfacesINFORMS

Published: Dec 1, 1994

Keywords: Keywords : decision analysis: systems ; decision analysis: applications

There are no references for this article.