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The quality of life in U.S. metropolitan areas in the 1990s

The quality of life in U.S. metropolitan areas in the 1990s This paper develops a quality–of–life index (QLI) for 129 U.S. Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in terms of their geographic amenity and disamenity characteristics. This study takes a general equilibrium approach to quality–of–life rankings by simultaneously considering the locational choices of consumers and producers. This approach yielded implicit equilibrium prices that simultaneously cleared the housing and labor markets permitting metropolitan area rankings based on consumer and producer choices over amenities and disamenities bundles. Finally, the study utilized principal component analysis to overcome the problem of multicollinearity between and among "weather normal" indicators, which were used to generate quality–of–life rankings of metropolitan areas for which a consistent data was available. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Environmental Review Inderscience Publishers

The quality of life in U.S. metropolitan areas in the 1990s

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1521-0227
eISSN
2042-6992
DOI
10.1504/IER.2001.053864
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper develops a quality–of–life index (QLI) for 129 U.S. Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in terms of their geographic amenity and disamenity characteristics. This study takes a general equilibrium approach to quality–of–life rankings by simultaneously considering the locational choices of consumers and producers. This approach yielded implicit equilibrium prices that simultaneously cleared the housing and labor markets permitting metropolitan area rankings based on consumer and producer choices over amenities and disamenities bundles. Finally, the study utilized principal component analysis to overcome the problem of multicollinearity between and among "weather normal" indicators, which were used to generate quality–of–life rankings of metropolitan areas for which a consistent data was available.

Journal

Interdisciplinary Environmental ReviewInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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