Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Micro-foundations of the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis: an empirical analysis

Micro-foundations of the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis: an empirical analysis The Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis argues for an inverted-U shaped relationship between economic development and environmental quality. Although this relation has been mainly enquired at the macro-economic level, it is actually resting on the assumption of a number of changes in the attitudes and behaviours of high-income country citizens. This paper looks for empirical evidence underneath this assumption using international social survey data. However, our results show that environmental attitudes and behaviours are only weakly related to national income. Moreover, even if the environmental concern tends to increase with GDP, this trend does not clearly translate either in actual greener behaviours or in high levels of political pro-environment activism. As a whole, our results cast some doubts on the empirical consistency of the micro-level assumptions behind the EKC hypothesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development Inderscience Publishers

Micro-foundations of the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis: an empirical analysis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/inderscience-publishers/micro-foundations-of-the-environmental-kuznets-curve-hypothesis-an-i6gvYDFGM3
Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1740-8822
eISSN
1740-8830
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis argues for an inverted-U shaped relationship between economic development and environmental quality. Although this relation has been mainly enquired at the macro-economic level, it is actually resting on the assumption of a number of changes in the attitudes and behaviours of high-income country citizens. This paper looks for empirical evidence underneath this assumption using international social survey data. However, our results show that environmental attitudes and behaviours are only weakly related to national income. Moreover, even if the environmental concern tends to increase with GDP, this trend does not clearly translate either in actual greener behaviours or in high levels of political pro-environment activism. As a whole, our results cast some doubts on the empirical consistency of the micro-level assumptions behind the EKC hypothesis.

Journal

International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable DevelopmentInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.