Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Material–semiotic practices of water quality testing and standards: the constitution of water contamination in Walkerton, Ontario, Canada

Material–semiotic practices of water quality testing and standards: the constitution of water... During the summer of 2000, Walkerton, a normally quiet town in the heart of rural Ontario, became the unfortunate site of Canada's worst outbreak of drinking water contamination. This case, however tragic, provides an opportunity to critically examine the complex interplay between science, policy, and multiple forms of knowledge and practice that occurs in the contentious arena of water quality testing and safety standards in Ontario. What becomes obvious from this story is that conventional reductionist approaches and ideologies have been less able to contribute to our understanding of the growing problems associated with contemporary water quality practices because they conceal the process that underlie their development - a hybrid process that is as much about ethics and politics as it is science. Understanding water quality testing and safety standards' hybrid nature and their material–semiotic practices is imperative in acknowledging the risks and responsibilities associated with public health and environmental policy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Environmental Review Inderscience Publishers

Material–semiotic practices of water quality testing and standards: the constitution of water contamination in Walkerton, Ontario, Canada

Loading next page...
 
/lp/inderscience-publishers/material-semiotic-practices-of-water-quality-testing-and-standards-the-QSuKWUiGUx
Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1521-0227
eISSN
2042-6992
DOI
10.1504/IER.2002.054005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the summer of 2000, Walkerton, a normally quiet town in the heart of rural Ontario, became the unfortunate site of Canada's worst outbreak of drinking water contamination. This case, however tragic, provides an opportunity to critically examine the complex interplay between science, policy, and multiple forms of knowledge and practice that occurs in the contentious arena of water quality testing and safety standards in Ontario. What becomes obvious from this story is that conventional reductionist approaches and ideologies have been less able to contribute to our understanding of the growing problems associated with contemporary water quality practices because they conceal the process that underlie their development - a hybrid process that is as much about ethics and politics as it is science. Understanding water quality testing and safety standards' hybrid nature and their material–semiotic practices is imperative in acknowledging the risks and responsibilities associated with public health and environmental policy.

Journal

Interdisciplinary Environmental ReviewInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.