Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Macroeconomic policies and the environment: recent developments in environmental accounting

Macroeconomic policies and the environment: recent developments in environmental accounting During the past forty years, the study of environmental economics has been grounded primarily in the application of neoclassical microeconomics to environmental issues. Notwithstanding the (often valid) criticisms that have been raised against the neoclassical model by those who subscribe to the principles of either sustainable development or ecological economics, neoclassical microeconomics still constitutes the core components of the economist's "tool–box". With some adjustments, the focus is still essentially microeconomic: the individual, the firm, or the industry. In these circumstances, there is a tendency to overlook the impact of macroeconomic policies on the environment. Broadly speaking, three well–known analytical instruments have been developed to ascertain the impact of macroeconomic policy on the environment: policy analysis matrices (PAM); computable general equilibrium modelling (CGE); and environmental accounting. This paper focuses attention on the last of these. It outlines the conventional System of National Accounts (SNA) and highlights the shortcomings of this system in any attempt to move towards more sustainable economic development. Against this background, there follows a discussion of the introduction of a System of Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) in 1993. In general terms, SEEA is concerned with the development of "satellite" accounts that shed light on movements in resource stocks and the impact of pollution. Particular attention is paid to outlining four different types of "satellite" accounts: Adjusted National Accounts; Natural Resource Accounts; Resource and Pollutant Flow Accounts; and Environmental Expenditure Accounts. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of SEEA, this paper concludes with a brief review of the recent experience with environmental accounting in Namibia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Environmental Review Inderscience Publishers

Macroeconomic policies and the environment: recent developments in environmental accounting

Loading next page...
 
/lp/inderscience-publishers/macroeconomic-policies-and-the-environment-recent-developments-in-XLx7f0yy6q
Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1521-0227
eISSN
2042-6992
DOI
10.1504/IER.2001.053867
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the past forty years, the study of environmental economics has been grounded primarily in the application of neoclassical microeconomics to environmental issues. Notwithstanding the (often valid) criticisms that have been raised against the neoclassical model by those who subscribe to the principles of either sustainable development or ecological economics, neoclassical microeconomics still constitutes the core components of the economist's "tool–box". With some adjustments, the focus is still essentially microeconomic: the individual, the firm, or the industry. In these circumstances, there is a tendency to overlook the impact of macroeconomic policies on the environment. Broadly speaking, three well–known analytical instruments have been developed to ascertain the impact of macroeconomic policy on the environment: policy analysis matrices (PAM); computable general equilibrium modelling (CGE); and environmental accounting. This paper focuses attention on the last of these. It outlines the conventional System of National Accounts (SNA) and highlights the shortcomings of this system in any attempt to move towards more sustainable economic development. Against this background, there follows a discussion of the introduction of a System of Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) in 1993. In general terms, SEEA is concerned with the development of "satellite" accounts that shed light on movements in resource stocks and the impact of pollution. Particular attention is paid to outlining four different types of "satellite" accounts: Adjusted National Accounts; Natural Resource Accounts; Resource and Pollutant Flow Accounts; and Environmental Expenditure Accounts. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of SEEA, this paper concludes with a brief review of the recent experience with environmental accounting in Namibia.

Journal

Interdisciplinary Environmental ReviewInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.