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Distance and dissolution: geographic patterns of support for and opposition to dredging the Hudson River

Distance and dissolution: geographic patterns of support for and opposition to dredging the... Federal law mandates a period of public comment on major environmental policy decisions. All comments, including the address of the commenter, are filed in a publicly available database. Such information is natural for geographic analysis, particularly in the case of the Hudson River Superfund site where perceived costs and benefits vary greatly along the river. The geographical pattern of support for and opposition to the EPA's dredging plan for the Hudson River Superfund site shows the action to be far less popular near the proposed site on the Upper Hudson than to the south. Results also show the importance of information conduits like corporations and environmental groups in the response to such an issue. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Environmental Review Inderscience Publishers

Distance and dissolution: geographic patterns of support for and opposition to dredging the Hudson River

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1521-0227
eISSN
2042-6992
DOI
10.1504/IER.2002.053893
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Federal law mandates a period of public comment on major environmental policy decisions. All comments, including the address of the commenter, are filed in a publicly available database. Such information is natural for geographic analysis, particularly in the case of the Hudson River Superfund site where perceived costs and benefits vary greatly along the river. The geographical pattern of support for and opposition to the EPA's dredging plan for the Hudson River Superfund site shows the action to be far less popular near the proposed site on the Upper Hudson than to the south. Results also show the importance of information conduits like corporations and environmental groups in the response to such an issue.

Journal

Interdisciplinary Environmental ReviewInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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