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Delay, deny, delete and destroy: American conservatism and environmental protection

Delay, deny, delete and destroy: American conservatism and environmental protection In the American political lexicon, the term NIMBY has become quite prominent. To it should be added, NIMEY and NIMTO; i.e. not in my election year and not in my term of office. The current U.S. federal administration is dominated in all three branches by ideological and pragmatic conservatives. Hostility toward the national environmental agenda which they inherited has been masked by subtle rhetoric and skilful use of the levers of power. The Bush administration has used the powers of the Executive to delay implementation of pending environmental initiatives, deny access of traditional environmental "players" to the process, delete from public access critical information and destroy environmental protections via use of the regulatory authority, control of the budget and cooperation with a mostly compliant Congress. This paper explores the skillfully crafted "big picture" of the Bush agenda toward the environment and their efforts at de–legitimizing the American environmental movement. Special emphasis will be paid toward the Bush administration efforts at: 1) delaying implementation of national and international policies with regard to climate change in the name of "science"; 2) opening up military lands and bases from compliance with environmental laws in the name of military preparedness; 3) removing information vital to action in the courts and in the field with regard to environmental hazards in the name of national security; 4) development of national energy plans with no legitimate input from the environmental community; 5) delaying implementation of vital air quality initiatives while waiting on Congress to pass their "Clean Skies" initiative; 6) shrinking the budgets of key environmental agencies and sources of environmental information including EPA, NASA, NOAA, OSHA and others. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Environmental Review Inderscience Publishers

Delay, deny, delete and destroy: American conservatism and environmental protection

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1521-0227
eISSN
2042-6992
DOI
10.1504/IER.2005.053941
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the American political lexicon, the term NIMBY has become quite prominent. To it should be added, NIMEY and NIMTO; i.e. not in my election year and not in my term of office. The current U.S. federal administration is dominated in all three branches by ideological and pragmatic conservatives. Hostility toward the national environmental agenda which they inherited has been masked by subtle rhetoric and skilful use of the levers of power. The Bush administration has used the powers of the Executive to delay implementation of pending environmental initiatives, deny access of traditional environmental "players" to the process, delete from public access critical information and destroy environmental protections via use of the regulatory authority, control of the budget and cooperation with a mostly compliant Congress. This paper explores the skillfully crafted "big picture" of the Bush agenda toward the environment and their efforts at de–legitimizing the American environmental movement. Special emphasis will be paid toward the Bush administration efforts at: 1) delaying implementation of national and international policies with regard to climate change in the name of "science"; 2) opening up military lands and bases from compliance with environmental laws in the name of military preparedness; 3) removing information vital to action in the courts and in the field with regard to environmental hazards in the name of national security; 4) development of national energy plans with no legitimate input from the environmental community; 5) delaying implementation of vital air quality initiatives while waiting on Congress to pass their "Clean Skies" initiative; 6) shrinking the budgets of key environmental agencies and sources of environmental information including EPA, NASA, NOAA, OSHA and others.

Journal

Interdisciplinary Environmental ReviewInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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