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Community–based conservation in East Africa: a case study of Western Usambara Mountains, Tanzania

Community–based conservation in East Africa: a case study of Western Usambara Mountains, Tanzania Multiple regions in East Africa face challenges due to increased rates of resource consumption and species extinction. We examined how well community–based conservation minimizes habitat loss for wildlife and marginalization of under–represented people. Using ecological field work and ethnographic techniques, we focused on how current land use in the Usambara Mountains, Tanzania, affects the ecology and social fabric of the area. We found low recruitment potential of non–native agricultural crops into adjacent forest reserves. We also found that certain agricultural practices that increase sustainability are slowly being integrated while others are still met with resistance. Communication between stakeholders has begun; however, without cooperation amongst key players the long–term future for wildlife and local people will be increasingly threatened as resource pressure intensifies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Environmental Review Inderscience Publishers

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1521-0227
eISSN
2042-6992
DOI
10.1504/IER.2005.053943
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Multiple regions in East Africa face challenges due to increased rates of resource consumption and species extinction. We examined how well community–based conservation minimizes habitat loss for wildlife and marginalization of under–represented people. Using ecological field work and ethnographic techniques, we focused on how current land use in the Usambara Mountains, Tanzania, affects the ecology and social fabric of the area. We found low recruitment potential of non–native agricultural crops into adjacent forest reserves. We also found that certain agricultural practices that increase sustainability are slowly being integrated while others are still met with resistance. Communication between stakeholders has begun; however, without cooperation amongst key players the long–term future for wildlife and local people will be increasingly threatened as resource pressure intensifies.

Journal

Interdisciplinary Environmental ReviewInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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