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Close-knit cities

Close-knit cities Aristotle rightly holds that the constitution of a city is not entirely captured by its written documents or official political structures. More fundamentally, the constitution of a city is made up of its real and deep habits, customs, relations, expectations, aspirations, and ideals of the people who live there. The aim here is to articulate five values that together constitute what I will call close-knit cities: a) ecological resiliency; b) intimate proximity; c) social heterogeneity; d) fairness; e) social trust. I give a brief account of each of these values alone, along the way showing how each value needs the others to be fully realised, and ultimately argue that at least most cities should aspire to become close-knit cities because they simultaneously realise environmental stewardship and enable human flourishing. Keywords: cities; urbanism; ecological urbanism; resiliency; intimate proximity; social heterogeneity; fair consideration of interests; trust; human flourishing; environmental stewardship. Reference to this paper should be made as follows: Matteson, J. (2016) `Close-knit cities', Interdisciplinary Environmental Review, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp.73­86. Biographical notes: Jason Matteson is a Lecturer at Northern Arizona University. This paper is a revised and expanded version of a paper entitled `Close-knit cities' presented at the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Environmental Review Inderscience Publishers

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.
ISSN
1521-0227
eISSN
2042-6992
DOI
10.1504/IER.2016.076143
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aristotle rightly holds that the constitution of a city is not entirely captured by its written documents or official political structures. More fundamentally, the constitution of a city is made up of its real and deep habits, customs, relations, expectations, aspirations, and ideals of the people who live there. The aim here is to articulate five values that together constitute what I will call close-knit cities: a) ecological resiliency; b) intimate proximity; c) social heterogeneity; d) fairness; e) social trust. I give a brief account of each of these values alone, along the way showing how each value needs the others to be fully realised, and ultimately argue that at least most cities should aspire to become close-knit cities because they simultaneously realise environmental stewardship and enable human flourishing. Keywords: cities; urbanism; ecological urbanism; resiliency; intimate proximity; social heterogeneity; fair consideration of interests; trust; human flourishing; environmental stewardship. Reference to this paper should be made as follows: Matteson, J. (2016) `Close-knit cities', Interdisciplinary Environmental Review, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp.73­86. Biographical notes: Jason Matteson is a Lecturer at Northern Arizona University. This paper is a revised and expanded version of a paper entitled `Close-knit cities' presented at the

Journal

Interdisciplinary Environmental ReviewInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2016

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