Carbon management strategies – a quest for corporate competitiveness

Carbon management strategies – a quest for corporate competitiveness This multiple case study analysis examines the extent to which five global car manufacturers apply carbon management strategies. Following a clear business strategy standpoint, the theoretical arguments are based on a framework developed by Orsato (2006). For this context, we highlight two key differences between carbon management and general environment strategies: the option of compensation and the demand for life-cycle efforts by stakeholders. Our analysis is based on eight carbon management strategies reflecting both carbon reduction and compensation strategies. The results show that the car manufacturers tend to embark on similar strategies in terms of carbon reductions, but less so for carbon compensation. Drawing on institutional theory, we explain this result by a lack of clearly established and widely expressed stakeholder expectations regarding carbon compensation. We conclude that carbon compensation may not yet be fully exploited and thus could be a short-term option when seeking competitive advantages in the automotive industry. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Progress in Industrial Ecology, an International Journal Inderscience Publishers

Carbon management strategies – a quest for corporate competitiveness

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1476-8917
eISSN
1478-8764
DOI
10.1504/PIE.2013.055053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This multiple case study analysis examines the extent to which five global car manufacturers apply carbon management strategies. Following a clear business strategy standpoint, the theoretical arguments are based on a framework developed by Orsato (2006). For this context, we highlight two key differences between carbon management and general environment strategies: the option of compensation and the demand for life-cycle efforts by stakeholders. Our analysis is based on eight carbon management strategies reflecting both carbon reduction and compensation strategies. The results show that the car manufacturers tend to embark on similar strategies in terms of carbon reductions, but less so for carbon compensation. Drawing on institutional theory, we explain this result by a lack of clearly established and widely expressed stakeholder expectations regarding carbon compensation. We conclude that carbon compensation may not yet be fully exploited and thus could be a short-term option when seeking competitive advantages in the automotive industry.

Journal

Progress in Industrial Ecology, an International JournalInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2013

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