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Carbon capture: the rise of the influence of Australia and Canada on climate negotiations

Carbon capture: the rise of the influence of Australia and Canada on climate negotiations In this paper, we explore the emergence of an alliance between Australia and Canada, an alliance that helped to derail climate change negotiations at two international meetings in 2013. We hypothesise that carbon-based industries create policy ties to national governments in order to forestall regulation, using negotiators to create a global policy corral (Barley, 2010). We use three events in 2009 that increased risks to carbon-based industries as a natural experiment: the change in the US presidency, the onset of the Great Recession and the sudden rise in Chinese investment in photovoltaics. Using panel data, we create a model for the impact of social, political and environmental factors and for the changing influence of industries. We find that the correlation between national carbon assets and climate policy increases in these two countries after 2009, suggesting that corporate interests were able to incorporate these governments into new international policy corrals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development Inderscience Publishers

Carbon capture: the rise of the influence of Australia and Canada on climate negotiations

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd
ISSN
1740-8822
eISSN
1740-8830
DOI
10.1504/IJISD.2017.086870
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this paper, we explore the emergence of an alliance between Australia and Canada, an alliance that helped to derail climate change negotiations at two international meetings in 2013. We hypothesise that carbon-based industries create policy ties to national governments in order to forestall regulation, using negotiators to create a global policy corral (Barley, 2010). We use three events in 2009 that increased risks to carbon-based industries as a natural experiment: the change in the US presidency, the onset of the Great Recession and the sudden rise in Chinese investment in photovoltaics. Using panel data, we create a model for the impact of social, political and environmental factors and for the changing influence of industries. We find that the correlation between national carbon assets and climate policy increases in these two countries after 2009, suggesting that corporate interests were able to incorporate these governments into new international policy corrals.

Journal

International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable DevelopmentInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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