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"The Fittest Man in the Kingdom": Thomas Reid and the Glasgow Chair of Moral Philosophy

"The Fittest Man in the Kingdom": Thomas Reid and the Glasgow Chair of Moral Philosophy Hume Studies Volume XXIII, Number 2, November 1997, pp. 277-313 PAUL WOOD The University of Glasgow figures prominently in any map we might wish to draw of David Hume's intellectual landscape, for Hume crossed paths with the incumbents of the Glasgow chair of moral philosophy in various ways during his career as a man of letters. If Hume attended William Law's optional course on moral philosophy during his student days at Edinburgh, he might well have been introduced to the natural law tradition through Gerschom Carmichael's highly influential edition of Pufendorf's De Officio Hominis et Civis.1 Later, Hume's exchanges with the renowned Glasgow moralist Francis Hutcheson in the years 1739 to 1743 sharpened his sense of the contrast between the style of philosophizing he championed in the Treatise and that practised by Hutcheson in the classroom, as well as their deep disagreements in the realm of moral theory.2 Hutcheson's subsequent opposition to Hume's abortive bid to become the Edinburgh Professor of Moral Philosophy in 1745 underlined their differences, and Hume's defeat may well have prompted him to cast prudence aside and to launch his sustained public campaign against religion (rational or otherwise) in 1748, with Hutcheson undoubtedly figuring http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

"The Fittest Man in the Kingdom": Thomas Reid and the Glasgow Chair of Moral Philosophy

Hume Studies , Volume 23 (2) – Jan 26, 1997

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Abstract

Hume Studies Volume XXIII, Number 2, November 1997, pp. 277-313 PAUL WOOD The University of Glasgow figures prominently in any map we might wish to draw of David Hume's intellectual landscape, for Hume crossed paths with the incumbents of the Glasgow chair of moral philosophy in various ways during his career as a man of letters. If Hume attended William Law's optional course on moral philosophy during his student days at Edinburgh, he might well have been introduced to the natural law tradition through Gerschom Carmichael's highly influential edition of Pufendorf's De Officio Hominis et Civis.1 Later, Hume's exchanges with the renowned Glasgow moralist Francis Hutcheson in the years 1739 to 1743 sharpened his sense of the contrast between the style of philosophizing he championed in the Treatise and that practised by Hutcheson in the classroom, as well as their deep disagreements in the realm of moral theory.2 Hutcheson's subsequent opposition to Hume's abortive bid to become the Edinburgh Professor of Moral Philosophy in 1745 underlined their differences, and Hume's defeat may well have prompted him to cast prudence aside and to launch his sustained public campaign against religion (rational or otherwise) in 1748, with Hutcheson undoubtedly figuring

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Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jan 26, 1997

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