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Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise (review)

Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise (review) , pp. 241-249 MARINA FRASCA-SPADA. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. xiii + 220. ISBN 0-521-620-910, $59.95, cloth. Marina Frasca-Spada's Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise proposes a subjective idealist interpretation of Hume's account of space in part ii of Book I of the Treatise. The book is divided into four chapters. The first deals with Hume's position on infinite divisibility in I ii 1-2, the second with his position on the origin of the idea of space in I ii 3, the third with his account of geometrical knowledge in I ii 4, and the final chapter with his position on vacuum in I ii 5. The subject matter of I ii 6 on the idea of existence is dealt with over the course of the third chapter (146-149). Between the second and third chapters, the exposition is interrupted by what Frasca-Spada calls an "Intermezzo." This piece begins by promising to explain why Hume's theory of space is "central to the philosophical substance of the Treatise" (85), but turns to other topics before delivering on the promise. Its relation to the other parts of the book is unclear, and it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise (review)

Hume Studies , Volume 25 (1) – Jan 26, 1999

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Hume Society
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Copyright © Hume Society
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1947-9921
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Abstract

, pp. 241-249 MARINA FRASCA-SPADA. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. xiii + 220. ISBN 0-521-620-910, $59.95, cloth. Marina Frasca-Spada's Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise proposes a subjective idealist interpretation of Hume's account of space in part ii of Book I of the Treatise. The book is divided into four chapters. The first deals with Hume's position on infinite divisibility in I ii 1-2, the second with his position on the origin of the idea of space in I ii 3, the third with his account of geometrical knowledge in I ii 4, and the final chapter with his position on vacuum in I ii 5. The subject matter of I ii 6 on the idea of existence is dealt with over the course of the third chapter (146-149). Between the second and third chapters, the exposition is interrupted by what Frasca-Spada calls an "Intermezzo." This piece begins by promising to explain why Hume's theory of space is "central to the philosophical substance of the Treatise" (85), but turns to other topics before delivering on the promise. Its relation to the other parts of the book is unclear, and it

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Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jan 26, 1999

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