Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Skepticism and Philo's Atheistic Preference

Skepticism and Philo's Atheistic Preference , pp. 267-282 Skepticism and Philo's Atheistic Preference [H]owever consistent the world may be. .. with the idea of... a very powerful, wise, and benevolent Deity ... it can never afford us an inference concerning his existence. The consistence is not absolutely denied, only the inference.1 The whole presents nothing but the idea of a blind nature, impreg- nated by a great vivifying principle, and pouring forth from her lap, without discernment or parental care, her maimed and abortive children. (DNR, 211) The true conclusion is, that the original source of all things is en- tirely indifferent to all these principles, and has no more regard to good above ill than to heat above cold, or to drought above moisture, or to light above heavy. (DNR, 212) There may four hypotheses be framed concerning the first causes of the universe: that they are endowed with perfect goodness, that they have perfect malice, that they are opposite and have both goodness and malice, that they have neither goodness nor malice. . . . The fourth ... seems by far the most probable. (DNR, 212) is Professor of Philosophy, Seton Hall University, South Orange, New Jersey 07079. e-mail: oconnoda@shu.edu What http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

Skepticism and Philo's Atheistic Preference

Hume Studies , Volume 29 (2) – Jan 26, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/hume-society/skepticism-and-philo-s-atheistic-preference-9VQSe0IRJW
Publisher
Hume Society
Copyright
Copyright © Hume Society
ISSN
1947-9921
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

, pp. 267-282 Skepticism and Philo's Atheistic Preference [H]owever consistent the world may be. .. with the idea of... a very powerful, wise, and benevolent Deity ... it can never afford us an inference concerning his existence. The consistence is not absolutely denied, only the inference.1 The whole presents nothing but the idea of a blind nature, impreg- nated by a great vivifying principle, and pouring forth from her lap, without discernment or parental care, her maimed and abortive children. (DNR, 211) The true conclusion is, that the original source of all things is en- tirely indifferent to all these principles, and has no more regard to good above ill than to heat above cold, or to drought above moisture, or to light above heavy. (DNR, 212) There may four hypotheses be framed concerning the first causes of the universe: that they are endowed with perfect goodness, that they have perfect malice, that they are opposite and have both goodness and malice, that they have neither goodness nor malice. . . . The fourth ... seems by far the most probable. (DNR, 212) is Professor of Philosophy, Seton Hall University, South Orange, New Jersey 07079. e-mail: oconnoda@shu.edu What

Journal

Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jan 26, 2003

There are no references for this article.