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J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy

J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy , pp. 207-224 Critical Study J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy JOHN MARSHALL J. B. SCHNEEWIND. The Invention of Autonomy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. xxii + 624. ISBN 0-521-47399-3, $69.95, cloth; ISBN 0521-47938-X, $26.95, paper. In J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy we are given a monumental history of moral philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a history more comprehensive and richer in detail than one would have thought possible in a single volume. Though the daunting erudition, agreeably unobtrusive, inspires confidence, it is Schneewind's gift of narrative that makes his book such a pleasure and his story so compelling. Schneewind originally conceived the book, he tells us, to "broaden our historical comprehension of Kant's moral philosophy by relating it to the earlier work to which it was a response" (3), but he does much, much more as he charts the fitful transition from morality as obedience to the later and now widely accepted conception of morality as self-governance. In its broad outline, the story is familiar, beginning with Montaigne's skepticism, moving through modern natural law theory, rationalist, perfectionist, and moral sense responses and ending with Bentham and Kant. But Schneewind adds to acute http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy

Hume Studies , Volume 25 (1) – Jan 26, 1999

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Hume Society
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Copyright © Hume Society
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1947-9921
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Abstract

, pp. 207-224 Critical Study J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy JOHN MARSHALL J. B. SCHNEEWIND. The Invention of Autonomy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. xxii + 624. ISBN 0-521-47399-3, $69.95, cloth; ISBN 0521-47938-X, $26.95, paper. In J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy we are given a monumental history of moral philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a history more comprehensive and richer in detail than one would have thought possible in a single volume. Though the daunting erudition, agreeably unobtrusive, inspires confidence, it is Schneewind's gift of narrative that makes his book such a pleasure and his story so compelling. Schneewind originally conceived the book, he tells us, to "broaden our historical comprehension of Kant's moral philosophy by relating it to the earlier work to which it was a response" (3), but he does much, much more as he charts the fitful transition from morality as obedience to the later and now widely accepted conception of morality as self-governance. In its broad outline, the story is familiar, beginning with Montaigne's skepticism, moving through modern natural law theory, rationalist, perfectionist, and moral sense responses and ending with Bentham and Kant. But Schneewind adds to acute

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Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jan 26, 1999

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