Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ideology and Partiality in David Hume's History of England

Ideology and Partiality in David Hume's History of England IDEOLOGY AND PARTIALITY IN DAVID HUME'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND Since its publication in 1754-62, critical assessments of David Hume's History of England can be broadly divided into three phases. During Hume's lifetime the history was, on the whole, favorably received. It is true the first volume, treating the early Stuarts, met initially with a cold reception. The London booksellers, resentful of the History's Scottish publishers, waged a successful campaign to stifle its commercial success. And the sympathetic portrait which Hume drew of the Stuarts, especially Charles I, precipitated a round of rebuttals against this "Tory" historian. Nevertheless, Hume's succeeding volumes met with a far kinder fate, and the complete history, ten years after the Stuart volume appeared, had already established itself as by far the most popular history of England ever written. Even from Hume's detractors there was widespread praise for his literary grace and narrative clarity. And the response from the Continent was enthusiastic. Voltaire's rapturous assessment echoed the views of many: Nothing can be added to the fame of this history, perhaps the best ever written in any language.... Mr. Hume, in his History, is neither Parliamentarian nor Royalist, nor Anglican nor Presbyterian Â-- he is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

Ideology and Partiality in David Hume's History of England

Hume Studies , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 26, 1985

Loading next page...
 
/lp/hume-society/ideology-and-partiality-in-david-hume-s-history-of-england-fimmU5gFsY
Publisher
Hume Society
Copyright
Copyright © Hume Society
ISSN
1947-9921
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IDEOLOGY AND PARTIALITY IN DAVID HUME'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND Since its publication in 1754-62, critical assessments of David Hume's History of England can be broadly divided into three phases. During Hume's lifetime the history was, on the whole, favorably received. It is true the first volume, treating the early Stuarts, met initially with a cold reception. The London booksellers, resentful of the History's Scottish publishers, waged a successful campaign to stifle its commercial success. And the sympathetic portrait which Hume drew of the Stuarts, especially Charles I, precipitated a round of rebuttals against this "Tory" historian. Nevertheless, Hume's succeeding volumes met with a far kinder fate, and the complete history, ten years after the Stuart volume appeared, had already established itself as by far the most popular history of England ever written. Even from Hume's detractors there was widespread praise for his literary grace and narrative clarity. And the response from the Continent was enthusiastic. Voltaire's rapturous assessment echoed the views of many: Nothing can be added to the fame of this history, perhaps the best ever written in any language.... Mr. Hume, in his History, is neither Parliamentarian nor Royalist, nor Anglican nor Presbyterian Â-- he is

Journal

Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jan 26, 1985

There are no references for this article.