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“Distant and Commonly Faint and Disfigured Originals”: Hume’s Magna Charta and Sabl’s Fundamental Constitutional Conventions

“Distant and Commonly Faint and Disfigured Originals”: Hume’s Magna Charta and Sabl’s Fundamental... , pp. 73­80 They say you can't judge a book by its cover. If that is right, it really is too bad in the case of Andrew Sabl's Hume's Politics. It is too bad because the reviewer's job would be exceedingly easy, and very pleasant. By any measure this book has a strikingly fine cover. Its image is drawn from John Byam Liston Shaw's (1872­1919) depiction of Queen Mary and Princess Elizabeth entering London in 1553. Hume's interpretation of Elizabeth I (in particular Elizabeth's "constitutional conventions") plays a prominent role in Hume's Politics, so I will come back to her. But first, looking beneath the cover, what else does Sabl's book yield? The short answer is that it yields plenty. There are several important points being made in this artfully-conceived volume. One is that Hume's political thought continues to be of relevance today. As Sabl puts it, Hume's Politics "aims to clarify Hume, and shine light on his contributions. But it also aims to help us better understand the political world. It is a study not only in what Hume says but in what political theory can do."1 Another important point relates to how we see the History http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

“Distant and Commonly Faint and Disfigured Originals”: Hume’s Magna Charta and Sabl’s Fundamental Constitutional Conventions

Hume Studies , Volume 41 (1) – Mar 27, 2015

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Hume Society
Copyright
Copyright © Hume Society
ISSN
1947-9921
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Abstract

, pp. 73­80 They say you can't judge a book by its cover. If that is right, it really is too bad in the case of Andrew Sabl's Hume's Politics. It is too bad because the reviewer's job would be exceedingly easy, and very pleasant. By any measure this book has a strikingly fine cover. Its image is drawn from John Byam Liston Shaw's (1872­1919) depiction of Queen Mary and Princess Elizabeth entering London in 1553. Hume's interpretation of Elizabeth I (in particular Elizabeth's "constitutional conventions") plays a prominent role in Hume's Politics, so I will come back to her. But first, looking beneath the cover, what else does Sabl's book yield? The short answer is that it yields plenty. There are several important points being made in this artfully-conceived volume. One is that Hume's political thought continues to be of relevance today. As Sabl puts it, Hume's Politics "aims to clarify Hume, and shine light on his contributions. But it also aims to help us better understand the political world. It is a study not only in what Hume says but in what political theory can do."1 Another important point relates to how we see the History

Journal

Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Mar 27, 2015

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