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David Hume on Personal Identity and the Indirect Passions

David Hume on Personal Identity and the Indirect Passions David Hume on Personal Identity and the Indirect Passions Scholarly reflection on Hume's "doctrine" of self and personal identity continues to focus on the sections "Of Personal Identity" and the "Appendix" to A Treatise ofHuman Nature. To answer the question of why we have so great a propension to ascribe an identity to these successive perceptions which make up experience, Hume says that we must distinguish betwixt personal identity, as it regards our thought or imagination, and as it regards our passions or the concern we take in ourselves. He considers only the former in these sections. Towards the end of the personal identity section he writes that our identity with regard to the passions serves to corroborate that with regard to the imagination, by the making our distant perceptions influence each other, and by giving us a present concern for our past or future pains or pleasures (T 261). In the advertisement to the Treatise Hume says that the subjects of the understanding and passions make a compleat chain of reasoning by themselves (T xii). In light of the importance Hume attaches to the distinction, and since there are many indications that the Treatise should be read http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

David Hume on Personal Identity and the Indirect Passions

Hume Studies , Volume 16 (1) – Jan 26, 1990

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Publisher
Hume Society
Copyright
Copyright © Hume Society
ISSN
1947-9921
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Abstract

David Hume on Personal Identity and the Indirect Passions Scholarly reflection on Hume's "doctrine" of self and personal identity continues to focus on the sections "Of Personal Identity" and the "Appendix" to A Treatise ofHuman Nature. To answer the question of why we have so great a propension to ascribe an identity to these successive perceptions which make up experience, Hume says that we must distinguish betwixt personal identity, as it regards our thought or imagination, and as it regards our passions or the concern we take in ourselves. He considers only the former in these sections. Towards the end of the personal identity section he writes that our identity with regard to the passions serves to corroborate that with regard to the imagination, by the making our distant perceptions influence each other, and by giving us a present concern for our past or future pains or pleasures (T 261). In the advertisement to the Treatise Hume says that the subjects of the understanding and passions make a compleat chain of reasoning by themselves (T xii). In light of the importance Hume attaches to the distinction, and since there are many indications that the Treatise should be read

Journal

Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jan 26, 1990

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