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David Hume, Moral and Political Theorist (review)

David Hume, Moral and Political Theorist (review) Volume 33, Number 2, November 2007, pp. 358-360 Russell Hardin. DavidHume, Moral and Political Theorist. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 240. ISBN 9780199232567, Hardback, $49.50. Hume scholars treasure the fact that the card catalogue entry in the British Library reads "David Hume, Historian." It is a reminder that once upon a (quaint) time, Hume was known for his best-selling History of England while his writings on metaphysics went largely unstudied. The title of Russell Hardin's thorough and provocative book reads like a new card catalogue entry, one that would have us view Hume in yet a different light. Hardin wants to show that Hume has a systematic project in moral and political theory, and, more controversially, that this project is of a particular kind. There are two propositions to which Hardin thinks Hume is committed. First of all, there is a psychological thesis: whatever views we hold about morality may be traced back to features of our psychology, and these features are entirely sufficient to explain our holding them. The objective truth and falsity of these views play no role. Second, there is an anti-realist thesis: knowledge of the objective truth about morality is not simply unnecessary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

David Hume, Moral and Political Theorist (review)

Hume Studies , Volume 33 (2) – Jan 26, 2007

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Hume Society
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Copyright © Hume Society
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1947-9921
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Abstract

Volume 33, Number 2, November 2007, pp. 358-360 Russell Hardin. DavidHume, Moral and Political Theorist. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 240. ISBN 9780199232567, Hardback, $49.50. Hume scholars treasure the fact that the card catalogue entry in the British Library reads "David Hume, Historian." It is a reminder that once upon a (quaint) time, Hume was known for his best-selling History of England while his writings on metaphysics went largely unstudied. The title of Russell Hardin's thorough and provocative book reads like a new card catalogue entry, one that would have us view Hume in yet a different light. Hardin wants to show that Hume has a systematic project in moral and political theory, and, more controversially, that this project is of a particular kind. There are two propositions to which Hardin thinks Hume is committed. First of all, there is a psychological thesis: whatever views we hold about morality may be traced back to features of our psychology, and these features are entirely sufficient to explain our holding them. The objective truth and falsity of these views play no role. Second, there is an anti-realist thesis: knowledge of the objective truth about morality is not simply unnecessary

Journal

Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jan 26, 2007

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