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David Hume and the Problem of Other Minds by Anik Waldow (review)

David Hume and the Problem of Other Minds by Anik Waldow (review) Volume 38, Number 1, 2012, pp. 123­126 Anik Waldow. David Hume and the Problem of Other Minds. London: Continuum, 2009. Pp. ix + 206. ISBN 978-0-8264-3304-6, Cloth, $130. ISBN 978-1-4411-2343-5, Paper, $44.95. As the title of her book suggests, Anik Waldow brings the philosophy of David Hume to bear on the problem of other minds. This is an interesting and worthwhile endeavor given Hume's reputation as one who exacerbates rather than mitigates this intractable problem. Waldow argues that Hume offers us a way of justifying our belief in other minds. Her strategy is two-fold. First, using only Hume's austere resources of perceptions and relations between perceptions, Waldow explains how a person can form a general idea of the mind and come to think of herself as one mind among others. Second, she argues from within Hume's framework, and on his behalf, that this belief is not only explicable but also "fully legitimate" and justified (12). Her explanation of the formation of a general idea of the mind and of a conception of the self as one mind among others is carefully constructed, novel, and compelling. However, her argument that the belief in other minds is justified or that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

David Hume and the Problem of Other Minds by Anik Waldow (review)

Hume Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Aug 23, 2012

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Hume Society
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Copyright © Hume Society
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1947-9921
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Abstract

Volume 38, Number 1, 2012, pp. 123­126 Anik Waldow. David Hume and the Problem of Other Minds. London: Continuum, 2009. Pp. ix + 206. ISBN 978-0-8264-3304-6, Cloth, $130. ISBN 978-1-4411-2343-5, Paper, $44.95. As the title of her book suggests, Anik Waldow brings the philosophy of David Hume to bear on the problem of other minds. This is an interesting and worthwhile endeavor given Hume's reputation as one who exacerbates rather than mitigates this intractable problem. Waldow argues that Hume offers us a way of justifying our belief in other minds. Her strategy is two-fold. First, using only Hume's austere resources of perceptions and relations between perceptions, Waldow explains how a person can form a general idea of the mind and come to think of herself as one mind among others. Second, she argues from within Hume's framework, and on his behalf, that this belief is not only explicable but also "fully legitimate" and justified (12). Her explanation of the formation of a general idea of the mind and of a conception of the self as one mind among others is carefully constructed, novel, and compelling. However, her argument that the belief in other minds is justified or that

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Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Aug 23, 2012

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