Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cultivating Strength of Mind: Hume on the Government of the Passions and Artificial Virtue

Cultivating Strength of Mind: Hume on the Government of the Passions and Artificial Virtue Abstract: Several authors have recently noted Hume's relative silence on the virtue of strength of mind and how it is developed. In this paper I suggest that Hume had good reasons for this silence, and I argue that Hume's discussion of artificial virtue, especially the virtue of allegiance, reveals a complex view of the limitations on human efforts at self-reform. Further, it reveals the need for government and externally-imposed regulative structures to enable the development of strength of mind. I argue that because of this, strength of mind awkwardly straddles Hume's distinction between natural and artificial virtue. I conclude that, in comparison with traditional models of self-control, Humean strength of mind is indirect, artificial, and social. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hume Studies Hume Society

Cultivating Strength of Mind: Hume on the Government of the Passions and Artificial Virtue

Hume Studies , Volume 41 (2) – Jun 7, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/hume-society/cultivating-strength-of-mind-hume-on-the-government-of-the-passions-KXdEx4chkQ
Publisher
Hume Society
Copyright
Copyright © Hume Society
ISSN
1947-9921
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Several authors have recently noted Hume's relative silence on the virtue of strength of mind and how it is developed. In this paper I suggest that Hume had good reasons for this silence, and I argue that Hume's discussion of artificial virtue, especially the virtue of allegiance, reveals a complex view of the limitations on human efforts at self-reform. Further, it reveals the need for government and externally-imposed regulative structures to enable the development of strength of mind. I argue that because of this, strength of mind awkwardly straddles Hume's distinction between natural and artificial virtue. I conclude that, in comparison with traditional models of self-control, Humean strength of mind is indirect, artificial, and social.

Journal

Hume StudiesHume Society

Published: Jun 7, 2015

There are no references for this article.