Persuasion by Proxy: Effects of Vicarious Self-Control Use on Reactions to Persuasion Attempts

Persuasion by Proxy: Effects of Vicarious Self-Control Use on Reactions to Persuasion Attempts Why do people sometimes struggle to say “no” to persuasion attempts? Research suggests that individual self-control use can deplete people, reducing those individuals' resistance to persuasion attempts. The current investigation instead tests whether the experience of mental connection between self-control users and observers can make observers more agreeable and compliant. Greater connection led observers to exhibit more positive attitudes and decisions toward persuasive messages and advertisements containing centrally processed arguments. This research identifies an important and commonly overlooked factor in self-regulatory contexts and helps to advance our mechanistic understanding of vicarious self-control processes. Thus, in social settings marked by high mental connection, as in many group meals or shopping trips, people may suffer the depleting consequences of others' decisions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Cognition Guilford Press

Persuasion by Proxy: Effects of Vicarious Self-Control Use on Reactions to Persuasion Attempts

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
0278-016X
D.O.I.
10.1521/soco.2018.36.3.275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Why do people sometimes struggle to say “no” to persuasion attempts? Research suggests that individual self-control use can deplete people, reducing those individuals' resistance to persuasion attempts. The current investigation instead tests whether the experience of mental connection between self-control users and observers can make observers more agreeable and compliant. Greater connection led observers to exhibit more positive attitudes and decisions toward persuasive messages and advertisements containing centrally processed arguments. This research identifies an important and commonly overlooked factor in self-regulatory contexts and helps to advance our mechanistic understanding of vicarious self-control processes. Thus, in social settings marked by high mental connection, as in many group meals or shopping trips, people may suffer the depleting consequences of others' decisions.

Journal

Social CognitionGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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