Priming Effects of Heat on Aggressive Thoughts

Priming Effects of Heat on Aggressive Thoughts To investigate the effects of aversive conditions on priming of aggressive thoughts, 16 men and 16 women were assigned to either a normal temperature condition (21°C) or a hot condition (33°C). Participants completed story stems under the guise of studying how a variety of environmental factors such as noise, heat, and lighting might affect performance. Some story stems were ambiguous, in that either aggressive or nonaggressive endings were both plausible. Other stems were neutral, omitting cues that aggression might occur. The results revealed that people in the hot condition completed the neutral story stems with no more aggressive content than was found for the normal-temperature group. Low levels of aggressive content were found in the normal-temperature group's completion of the ambiguous stems. In contrast, the hot-temperature subjects employed significantly more negative emotions, frustrators, and aggression in the completion of the ambiguous story stems. These data support the premise that exposure to aversive stimulation primes thoughts associated with aggression, such that they can be more readily activated by cues of low salience. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Cognition Guilford Press

Priming Effects of Heat on Aggressive Thoughts

Loading next page...
 
/lp/guilford-press/priming-effects-of-heat-on-aggressive-thoughts-kYjUAbS93c
Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© 1987 Guilford Publications Inc.
ISSN
0278-016X
DOI
10.1521/soco.1987.5.2.131
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To investigate the effects of aversive conditions on priming of aggressive thoughts, 16 men and 16 women were assigned to either a normal temperature condition (21°C) or a hot condition (33°C). Participants completed story stems under the guise of studying how a variety of environmental factors such as noise, heat, and lighting might affect performance. Some story stems were ambiguous, in that either aggressive or nonaggressive endings were both plausible. Other stems were neutral, omitting cues that aggression might occur. The results revealed that people in the hot condition completed the neutral story stems with no more aggressive content than was found for the normal-temperature group. Low levels of aggressive content were found in the normal-temperature group's completion of the ambiguous stems. In contrast, the hot-temperature subjects employed significantly more negative emotions, frustrators, and aggression in the completion of the ambiguous story stems. These data support the premise that exposure to aversive stimulation primes thoughts associated with aggression, such that they can be more readily activated by cues of low salience.

Journal

Social CognitionGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 1987

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off