Unequal Exchange and Meiotic Instability of Disease-Resistance Genes in the Rp1 Region of Maize

Unequal Exchange and Meiotic Instability of Disease-Resistance Genes in the Rp1 Region of Maize M. A. Sudupak, J. L. Bennetzen and S. H. Hulbert Department of Plant Pathology, Throckmorton Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-5502 The Rp1 region of maize was originally characterized as a complex locus which conditions resistance to the fungus Puccinia sorghi, the causal organism in the common rust disease. Some alleles of Rp1 are meiotically unstable, but the mechanism of instability is not known. We have studied the role of recombination in meiotic instability in maize lines homozygous for either Rp1-J or Rp1-G. Test cross progenies derived from a line that was homozygous for Rp1-J, but heterozygous at flanking markers, were screened for susceptible individuals. Five susceptible individuals were derived from 9772 progeny. All five had nonparental combinations of flanking markers; three had one combination of recombinant flanking markers while the other two had the opposite pair. In an identical study with Rp1-G, 20 susceptible seedlings were detected out of 5874 test cross progeny. Nineteen of these were associated with flanking marker exchange, 11 and 8 of each recombinant marker combination. Our results indicate that unequal exchange is the primary mechanism of meiotic instability of Rp1-J and Rp1-G. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

Unequal Exchange and Meiotic Instability of Disease-Resistance Genes in the Rp1 Region of Maize

Genetics, Volume 133 (1): 119 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
Publisher site
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Abstract

M. A. Sudupak, J. L. Bennetzen and S. H. Hulbert Department of Plant Pathology, Throckmorton Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-5502 The Rp1 region of maize was originally characterized as a complex locus which conditions resistance to the fungus Puccinia sorghi, the causal organism in the common rust disease. Some alleles of Rp1 are meiotically unstable, but the mechanism of instability is not known. We have studied the role of recombination in meiotic instability in maize lines homozygous for either Rp1-J or Rp1-G. Test cross progenies derived from a line that was homozygous for Rp1-J, but heterozygous at flanking markers, were screened for susceptible individuals. Five susceptible individuals were derived from 9772 progeny. All five had nonparental combinations of flanking markers; three had one combination of recombinant flanking markers while the other two had the opposite pair. In an identical study with Rp1-G, 20 susceptible seedlings were detected out of 5874 test cross progeny. Nineteen of these were associated with flanking marker exchange, 11 and 8 of each recombinant marker combination. Our results indicate that unequal exchange is the primary mechanism of meiotic instability of Rp1-J and Rp1-G.

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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