Linked and Unlinked Transposition of a Genetically Marked Dissociation Element in Transgenic Tomato

Linked and Unlinked Transposition of a Genetically Marked Dissociation Element in Transgenic Tomato J. Healy, C. Corr, J. DeYoung and B. Baker Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Present address: Department of Bioengineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-Machi, Nagaoka-Shi, Niigata 940-21, Japan. We have introduced a genetically marked Dissociation transposable element (Ds(neo)) into tomato. In the presence of Ac transposase, Ds(neo) excised from an integrated T-DNA and reinserted at numerous new sites in the tomato genome. The marker genes of Ds(neo) (NPTII) and the T-DNA (HPT) facilitated identification of plants bearing transposon excisions and insertions. To explore the feasibility of gene tagging strategies in tomato using Ds(neo), we examined the genomic distribution of Ds(neo) receptor sites, relative to the location of the donor T-DNA locus. Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping of transposed Ds(neo) elements was conducted in two tomato families, derived from independent primary transformants each bearing Ds(neo) within a T-DNA at a unique position in the genome. Transposition of Ds(neo) generated clusters of insertions that were positioned on several different tomato chromosomes. Ds(neo) insertions were often located on the same chromosome as the T-DNA donor site. However, no insertion showed tight linkage to the T-DNA. We consider the frequency and distance of Ds(neo) transposition observed in tomato to be well suited for transposon mutagenesis. Our study made use of a novel, stable allele of Ac (Ac3) that we discovered in transgenic tomato. We determined that the Ac3 element bears a deletion of the outermost 5 base pairs of the 5'-terminal inverted repeat. Though incapable of transposition itself, Ac3 retained the ability to mobilize Ds(neo). We conclude that a dual element system, composed of the stable Ac3 trans-activator in combination with Ds(neo), is an effective tool for transposon tagging experiments in tomato. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

Linked and Unlinked Transposition of a Genetically Marked Dissociation Element in Transgenic Tomato

Genetics, Volume 134 (2): 571 – Jun 1, 1993

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Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
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Abstract

J. Healy, C. Corr, J. DeYoung and B. Baker Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Present address: Department of Bioengineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-Machi, Nagaoka-Shi, Niigata 940-21, Japan. We have introduced a genetically marked Dissociation transposable element (Ds(neo)) into tomato. In the presence of Ac transposase, Ds(neo) excised from an integrated T-DNA and reinserted at numerous new sites in the tomato genome. The marker genes of Ds(neo) (NPTII) and the T-DNA (HPT) facilitated identification of plants bearing transposon excisions and insertions. To explore the feasibility of gene tagging strategies in tomato using Ds(neo), we examined the genomic distribution of Ds(neo) receptor sites, relative to the location of the donor T-DNA locus. Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping of transposed Ds(neo) elements was conducted in two tomato families, derived from independent primary transformants each bearing Ds(neo) within a T-DNA at a unique position in the genome. Transposition of Ds(neo) generated clusters of insertions that were positioned on several different tomato chromosomes. Ds(neo) insertions were often located on the same chromosome as the T-DNA donor site. However, no insertion showed tight linkage to the T-DNA. We consider the frequency and distance of Ds(neo) transposition observed in tomato to be well suited for transposon mutagenesis. Our study made use of a novel, stable allele of Ac (Ac3) that we discovered in transgenic tomato. We determined that the Ac3 element bears a deletion of the outermost 5 base pairs of the 5'-terminal inverted repeat. Though incapable of transposition itself, Ac3 retained the ability to mobilize Ds(neo). We conclude that a dual element system, composed of the stable Ac3 trans-activator in combination with Ds(neo), is an effective tool for transposon tagging experiments in tomato.

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Jun 1, 1993

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