INTROGRESSION BETWEEN TWO CUTTHROAT TROUT SUBSPECIES WITH SUBSTANTIAL KARYOTYPIC, NUCLEAR AND MITOCHONDRIAL GENOMIC DIVERGENCE

INTROGRESSION BETWEEN TWO CUTTHROAT TROUT SUBSPECIES WITH SUBSTANTIAL KARYOTYPIC, NUCLEAR AND... INTROGRESSION BETWEEN TWO CUTTHROAT TROUT SUBSPECIES WITH SUBSTANTIAL KARYOTYPIC, NUCLEAR AND MITOCHONDRIAL GENOMIC DIVERGENCE Ulf Gyllensten 1 , Robb F. Leary 2 , Fred W. Allendorf 2 , and Allan C. Wilson 3 1 Department of Genetics, University of Stockholm, S-10691, Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 2 Department of Zoology, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812 3 Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 The authors used allozymes encoded by nuclear genes and restriction enzyme analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to study secondary contact between westslope ( Salmo clarki lewisi ) and Yellowstone cutthroat trout ( Salmo clarki bouvieri ) in Forest Lake, Montana. Eleven diagnostic allozyme loci identified this as a random-mating hybrid swarm. No parental, first-generation hybrid or backcross genotypes were detected in the sample ( N = 33), and genotype distributions at all the variable loci conform to binomial expectations. There is little linkage disequilibrium between the diagnostic loci, indicating that the nuclear genomes of the two subspecies are largely randomly associated. The allozymes and mtDNA give identical estimates of the proportional genetic contribution of each subspecies. Thus, males and females from both subspecies have contributed equally to this hybrid swarm. Although these subspecies have accumulated substantial genetic divergence between their nuclear (Nei's D = 0.34) and mitochondrial (2% sequence divergence) genomes, this has not resulted in a genetic barrier to exchange between them. Submitted on April 18, 1985 Accepted on July 29, 1985 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

INTROGRESSION BETWEEN TWO CUTTHROAT TROUT SUBSPECIES WITH SUBSTANTIAL KARYOTYPIC, NUCLEAR AND MITOCHONDRIAL GENOMIC DIVERGENCE

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Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTROGRESSION BETWEEN TWO CUTTHROAT TROUT SUBSPECIES WITH SUBSTANTIAL KARYOTYPIC, NUCLEAR AND MITOCHONDRIAL GENOMIC DIVERGENCE Ulf Gyllensten 1 , Robb F. Leary 2 , Fred W. Allendorf 2 , and Allan C. Wilson 3 1 Department of Genetics, University of Stockholm, S-10691, Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 2 Department of Zoology, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812 3 Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 The authors used allozymes encoded by nuclear genes and restriction enzyme analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to study secondary contact between westslope ( Salmo clarki lewisi ) and Yellowstone cutthroat trout ( Salmo clarki bouvieri ) in Forest Lake, Montana. Eleven diagnostic allozyme loci identified this as a random-mating hybrid swarm. No parental, first-generation hybrid or backcross genotypes were detected in the sample ( N = 33), and genotype distributions at all the variable loci conform to binomial expectations. There is little linkage disequilibrium between the diagnostic loci, indicating that the nuclear genomes of the two subspecies are largely randomly associated. The allozymes and mtDNA give identical estimates of the proportional genetic contribution of each subspecies. Thus, males and females from both subspecies have contributed equally to this hybrid swarm. Although these subspecies have accumulated substantial genetic divergence between their nuclear (Nei's D = 0.34) and mitochondrial (2% sequence divergence) genomes, this has not resulted in a genetic barrier to exchange between them. Submitted on April 18, 1985 Accepted on July 29, 1985

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Dec 1, 1985

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