Identification of Genes Controlling Growth Polarity in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Possible Role of N-Glycosylation and Involvement of the Exocyst Complex

Identification of Genes Controlling Growth Polarity in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces... C. Mondesert, D. J. Clarke and S. I. Reed The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, La Jolla, California 92037 The regulation of secretion polarity and cell surface growth during the cell cycle is critical for proper morphogenesis and viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A shift from isotropic cell surface growth to polarized growth is necessary for bud emergence and a repolarization of secretion to the bud neck is necessary for cell separation. Although alterations in the actin cytoskeleton have been implicated in these changes in secretion polarity, clearly other cellular systems involved in secretion are likely to be targets of cell cycle regulation. To investigate mechanisms coupling cell cycle progression to changes in secretion polarity in parallel with and downstream of regulation of actin polarization, we implemented a screen for mutants defective specifically in polarized growth but with normal actin cytoskeleton structure. These mutants fell into three classes: those partially defective in N-glycosylation, those linked to specific defects in the exocyst, and a third class neither defective in glycosylation nor linked to the exocyst. These results raise the possibility that changes in N-linked glycosylation may be involved in a signal linking cell cycle progression and secretion polarity and that the exocyst may have regulatory functions in coupling the secretory machinery to the polarized actin cytoskeleton. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

Identification of Genes Controlling Growth Polarity in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Possible Role of N-Glycosylation and Involvement of the Exocyst Complex

Genetics, Volume 147 (2): 421 – Oct 1, 1997

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Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
Publisher site
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Abstract

C. Mondesert, D. J. Clarke and S. I. Reed The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, La Jolla, California 92037 The regulation of secretion polarity and cell surface growth during the cell cycle is critical for proper morphogenesis and viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A shift from isotropic cell surface growth to polarized growth is necessary for bud emergence and a repolarization of secretion to the bud neck is necessary for cell separation. Although alterations in the actin cytoskeleton have been implicated in these changes in secretion polarity, clearly other cellular systems involved in secretion are likely to be targets of cell cycle regulation. To investigate mechanisms coupling cell cycle progression to changes in secretion polarity in parallel with and downstream of regulation of actin polarization, we implemented a screen for mutants defective specifically in polarized growth but with normal actin cytoskeleton structure. These mutants fell into three classes: those partially defective in N-glycosylation, those linked to specific defects in the exocyst, and a third class neither defective in glycosylation nor linked to the exocyst. These results raise the possibility that changes in N-linked glycosylation may be involved in a signal linking cell cycle progression and secretion polarity and that the exocyst may have regulatory functions in coupling the secretory machinery to the polarized actin cytoskeleton.

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Oct 1, 1997

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