Evolution and Expression of Homeologous Loci in Tragopogon miscellus (Asteraceae), a Recent and Reciprocally Formed Allopolyploid

Evolution and Expression of Homeologous Loci in Tragopogon miscellus (Asteraceae), a Recent and... On both recent and ancient time scales, polyploidy (genome doubling) has been a significant evolutionary force in plants. Here, we examined multiple individuals from reciprocally formed populations of Tragopogon miscellus , an allotetraploid that formed repeatedly within the last 80 years from the diploids T. dubius and T. pratensis . Using cDNA–AFLPs followed by genomic and cDNA cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) analyses, we found differences in the evolution and expression of homeologous loci in T. miscellus . Fragment variation within T. miscellus, possibly attributable to reciprocal formation, comprised 0.6% of the cDNA–AFLP bands. Genomic and cDNA CAPS analyses of 10 candidate genes revealed that only one “transcript-derived fragment” (TDF44) showed differential expression of parental homeologs in T. miscellus ; the T. pratensis homeolog was preferentially expressed by most polyploids in both populations. Most of the cDNA–AFLP polymorphisms apparently resulted from loss of parental fragments in the polyploids. Importantly, changes at the genomic level have occurred stochastically among individuals within the independently formed populations. Synthetic F 1 hybrids between putative diploid progenitors are additive of their parental genomes, suggesting that polyploidization rather than hybridization induces genomic changes in Tragopogon. Footnotes Sequence data from this article have been deposited with the EMBL/GenBank Data Libraries under accession nos. DQ267218 – DQ267256 . Communicating editor: A. H. D. B rown Received March 1, 2006. Accepted April 20, 2006. Copyright © 2006 by the Genetics Society of America http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

Evolution and Expression of Homeologous Loci in Tragopogon miscellus (Asteraceae), a Recent and Reciprocally Formed Allopolyploid

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Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
D.O.I.
10.1534/genetics.106.057646
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On both recent and ancient time scales, polyploidy (genome doubling) has been a significant evolutionary force in plants. Here, we examined multiple individuals from reciprocally formed populations of Tragopogon miscellus , an allotetraploid that formed repeatedly within the last 80 years from the diploids T. dubius and T. pratensis . Using cDNA–AFLPs followed by genomic and cDNA cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) analyses, we found differences in the evolution and expression of homeologous loci in T. miscellus . Fragment variation within T. miscellus, possibly attributable to reciprocal formation, comprised 0.6% of the cDNA–AFLP bands. Genomic and cDNA CAPS analyses of 10 candidate genes revealed that only one “transcript-derived fragment” (TDF44) showed differential expression of parental homeologs in T. miscellus ; the T. pratensis homeolog was preferentially expressed by most polyploids in both populations. Most of the cDNA–AFLP polymorphisms apparently resulted from loss of parental fragments in the polyploids. Importantly, changes at the genomic level have occurred stochastically among individuals within the independently formed populations. Synthetic F 1 hybrids between putative diploid progenitors are additive of their parental genomes, suggesting that polyploidization rather than hybridization induces genomic changes in Tragopogon. Footnotes Sequence data from this article have been deposited with the EMBL/GenBank Data Libraries under accession nos. DQ267218 – DQ267256 . Communicating editor: A. H. D. B rown Received March 1, 2006. Accepted April 20, 2006. Copyright © 2006 by the Genetics Society of America

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Jul 1, 2006

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