Circularized Ac/Ds Transposons: Formation, Structure and Fate

Circularized Ac/Ds Transposons: Formation, Structure and Fate Science, Rehovot, 76100 Israel Manuscript received August 23, 1996 Accepted for publication January 7 , 1997 ABSTRACT The maize Ac/Ds transposable elements are thought to transpose via a cut-and-paste mechanism,but the intermediates formed during transposition are still unknown. In this work we present evidence that circular Ac molecules are formed in plants containing actively transposing elements. In these circles, transposon ends are joined head-to-head. The sequence at the ends’ junction is variable, containing small deletions or insertions. Circles containing deleted Ac ends are probably unable tosuccessfully reintegrate. To test the ability of circles with intact transposon ends to integrate into the genome, an artificial Ds circle was constructed by cloning the joined ends of Ac into a plasmid carrying a plant selectable marker. When such a circular Ds was introduced into tobacco protoplasts in the presence of Ar-trdnsposase,no efficient transposase-mediated integration was observed. Although circular transposia tion intermediate cannot be ruled out, the findings of circles with deleted transposon ends and the absence of transposase-mediated integration of the circular D suggest that some of the joined-endss carrying elements are not transposition intermediates, but rather abortive excisionproducts. The formation of Ac circles might account for the previously described phenomenon http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

Circularized Ac/Ds Transposons: Formation, Structure and Fate

Genetics, Volume 145: 1161 – Apr 1, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/genetics-society-of-america/circularized-ac-ds-transposons-formation-structure-and-fate-XmFKI0alx0
Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Science, Rehovot, 76100 Israel Manuscript received August 23, 1996 Accepted for publication January 7 , 1997 ABSTRACT The maize Ac/Ds transposable elements are thought to transpose via a cut-and-paste mechanism,but the intermediates formed during transposition are still unknown. In this work we present evidence that circular Ac molecules are formed in plants containing actively transposing elements. In these circles, transposon ends are joined head-to-head. The sequence at the ends’ junction is variable, containing small deletions or insertions. Circles containing deleted Ac ends are probably unable tosuccessfully reintegrate. To test the ability of circles with intact transposon ends to integrate into the genome, an artificial Ds circle was constructed by cloning the joined ends of Ac into a plasmid carrying a plant selectable marker. When such a circular Ds was introduced into tobacco protoplasts in the presence of Ar-trdnsposase,no efficient transposase-mediated integration was observed. Although circular transposia tion intermediate cannot be ruled out, the findings of circles with deleted transposon ends and the absence of transposase-mediated integration of the circular D suggest that some of the joined-endss carrying elements are not transposition intermediates, but rather abortive excisionproducts. The formation of Ac circles might account for the previously described phenomenon

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Apr 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off