A TWO-SEX POLYGENIC MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF PREMATING ISOLATION. II. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF EXPERIMENTAL SELECTION PROCEDURES

A TWO-SEX POLYGENIC MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF PREMATING ISOLATION. II. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF... A TWO-SEX POLYGENIC MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF PREMATING ISOLATION. II. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF EXPERIMENTAL SELECTION PROCEDURES J. A. Sved 1 1 School of Biological Sciences A12, Sydney University, N.S.W. 2006, Australia and Institute of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark A Monte-Carlo simulation program is described for a polygenic mating model introduced in the first paper in this series ( Sved 1981). The program is used to simulate the situation in laboratory experiments in which two strains are allowed to mass-mate, hybrids are artificially eliminated and the establishment of mating isolation is studied. It is shown that, if mating choice is sufficiently precise, a combination of chance fluctuation and selection can lead to divergence in mating behavior. However, for small population sizes, the variability would usually be considerably reduced by the time some divergence is established, leading to low eventual levels of isolation. For larger population sizes, on the other hand, it may take many generations for any divergence to be established.—A dissection of the selective forces involved in the divergence shows that the major force potentially responsible for initial selective response is the tendency for divergent females and males to reject mates from the wrong strain. However, this is nullified in mixed-strain matings by the tendency of such individuals equally to reject mates from the correct strain. To overcome this problem, it is suggested that the usual mixed-strain mating procedure be replaced by procedures specifically designed to select for rejection of interstrain matings. Two procedures are suggested for this, and computer simulation shows that one or other of the procedures will work under the assumptions of the mating model. Other possible outcomes of selection, including asymmetrical divergence, are discussed for cases in which the assumptions of the mating model are invalid. Submitted on July 21, 1980 Revised on December 12, 1980 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

A TWO-SEX POLYGENIC MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF PREMATING ISOLATION. II. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF EXPERIMENTAL SELECTION PROCEDURES

Genetics, Volume 97 (1): 217 – Jan 1, 1981

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Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
Publisher site
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Abstract

A TWO-SEX POLYGENIC MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF PREMATING ISOLATION. II. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF EXPERIMENTAL SELECTION PROCEDURES J. A. Sved 1 1 School of Biological Sciences A12, Sydney University, N.S.W. 2006, Australia and Institute of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark A Monte-Carlo simulation program is described for a polygenic mating model introduced in the first paper in this series ( Sved 1981). The program is used to simulate the situation in laboratory experiments in which two strains are allowed to mass-mate, hybrids are artificially eliminated and the establishment of mating isolation is studied. It is shown that, if mating choice is sufficiently precise, a combination of chance fluctuation and selection can lead to divergence in mating behavior. However, for small population sizes, the variability would usually be considerably reduced by the time some divergence is established, leading to low eventual levels of isolation. For larger population sizes, on the other hand, it may take many generations for any divergence to be established.—A dissection of the selective forces involved in the divergence shows that the major force potentially responsible for initial selective response is the tendency for divergent females and males to reject mates from the wrong strain. However, this is nullified in mixed-strain matings by the tendency of such individuals equally to reject mates from the correct strain. To overcome this problem, it is suggested that the usual mixed-strain mating procedure be replaced by procedures specifically designed to select for rejection of interstrain matings. Two procedures are suggested for this, and computer simulation shows that one or other of the procedures will work under the assumptions of the mating model. Other possible outcomes of selection, including asymmetrical divergence, are discussed for cases in which the assumptions of the mating model are invalid. Submitted on July 21, 1980 Revised on December 12, 1980

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Jan 1, 1981

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