A MOLECULAR APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF GENIC HETEROZYGOSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS. II. AMOUNT OF VARIATION AND DEGREE OF HETEROZYGOSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS OF DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA

A MOLECULAR APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF GENIC HETEROZYGOSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS. II. AMOUNT OF... J . L. HUBBY Department of Zoology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois Received March 30, 1966 S pointed out in the first paper of this series (HUBBY LEWONTIN and 1966), no one knows at the present time the kinds and frequencies of variant alleles present in natural populations of any organism, with the exception of certain special classes of genes. For human populations we know a good deal about certain polymorphisms for blood cell antigens, serum proteins, and metabolic disorders of various kinds but we can hardly regard these, a priori, as typical of the genome as a whole. Clearly we need a method that will randomly sample the genome and detect a major proportion of the individual allelic substitutions that are segregating in a population. In our previous paper, we discussed a method for accomplishing this end by means of a study of electrophoretic variants at a large number of loci and we showed that the variation picked up by this method behaves in a simple Mendelian fashion so that phenotypes can be equated to homozygous and heterozygous genotypes at single loci. It is the purpose of this second paper to show the results of an application http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

A MOLECULAR APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF GENIC HETEROZYGOSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS. II. AMOUNT OF VARIATION AND DEGREE OF HETEROZYGOSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS OF DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA

Genetics, Volume 54: 595 – Aug 30, 1966

Loading next page...
 
/lp/genetics-society-of-america/a-molecular-approach-to-the-study-of-genic-heterozygosity-in-natural-0eL9e2i5Hk
Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J . L. HUBBY Department of Zoology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois Received March 30, 1966 S pointed out in the first paper of this series (HUBBY LEWONTIN and 1966), no one knows at the present time the kinds and frequencies of variant alleles present in natural populations of any organism, with the exception of certain special classes of genes. For human populations we know a good deal about certain polymorphisms for blood cell antigens, serum proteins, and metabolic disorders of various kinds but we can hardly regard these, a priori, as typical of the genome as a whole. Clearly we need a method that will randomly sample the genome and detect a major proportion of the individual allelic substitutions that are segregating in a population. In our previous paper, we discussed a method for accomplishing this end by means of a study of electrophoretic variants at a large number of loci and we showed that the variation picked up by this method behaves in a simple Mendelian fashion so that phenotypes can be equated to homozygous and heterozygous genotypes at single loci. It is the purpose of this second paper to show the results of an application

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Aug 30, 1966

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off