A Detailed Linkage Map of Rainbow Trout Produced Using Doubled Haploids

A Detailed Linkage Map of Rainbow Trout Produced Using Doubled Haploids William P. Young a , Paul A. Wheeler a , Virginia H. Coryell c , Paul Keim c , and Gary H. Thorgaard a,b a Department of Zoology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4236, b Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4234 c Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011-5640 Corresponding author: Gary H. Thorgaard, Department of Zoology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4236, thorglab@wsu.edu (E-mail). Communicating editor: D. B OTSTEIN We report the first detailed genetic linkage map of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ). The segregation analysis was performed using 76 doubled haploid rainbow trout produced by androgenesis from a hybrid between the "OSU" and "Arlee" androgenetically derived homozygous lines. Four hundred and seventy-six markers segregated into 31 major linkage groups and 11 small groups (< 5 markers/group). The minimum genome size is estimated to be 2627.5 cM in length. The sex-determining locus segregated to a distal position on one of the linkage groups. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution of three classes of markers: (1) amplified fragment length polymorphisms, (2) variable number of tandem repeats, and (3) markers obtained using probes homologous to the 5' or 3' end of salmonid-specific small interspersed nuclear elements. Many of the first class of markers were clustered in regions that appear to correspond to centromeres. The second class of markers were more telomeric in distribution, and the third class were intermediate. Tetrasomic inheritance, apparently related to the tetraploid ancestry of salmonid fishes, was detected at one simple sequence repeat locus and suggested by the presence of one extremely large linkage group that appeared to consist of two smaller groups linked at their tips. The double haploid rainbow trout lines and linkage map present a foundation for further genomic studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genetics Genetics Society of America

A Detailed Linkage Map of Rainbow Trout Produced Using Doubled Haploids

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Publisher
Genetics Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by the Genetics Society of America
ISSN
0016-6731
eISSN
1943-2631
Publisher site
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Abstract

William P. Young a , Paul A. Wheeler a , Virginia H. Coryell c , Paul Keim c , and Gary H. Thorgaard a,b a Department of Zoology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4236, b Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4234 c Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011-5640 Corresponding author: Gary H. Thorgaard, Department of Zoology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4236, thorglab@wsu.edu (E-mail). Communicating editor: D. B OTSTEIN We report the first detailed genetic linkage map of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ). The segregation analysis was performed using 76 doubled haploid rainbow trout produced by androgenesis from a hybrid between the "OSU" and "Arlee" androgenetically derived homozygous lines. Four hundred and seventy-six markers segregated into 31 major linkage groups and 11 small groups (< 5 markers/group). The minimum genome size is estimated to be 2627.5 cM in length. The sex-determining locus segregated to a distal position on one of the linkage groups. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution of three classes of markers: (1) amplified fragment length polymorphisms, (2) variable number of tandem repeats, and (3) markers obtained using probes homologous to the 5' or 3' end of salmonid-specific small interspersed nuclear elements. Many of the first class of markers were clustered in regions that appear to correspond to centromeres. The second class of markers were more telomeric in distribution, and the third class were intermediate. Tetrasomic inheritance, apparently related to the tetraploid ancestry of salmonid fishes, was detected at one simple sequence repeat locus and suggested by the presence of one extremely large linkage group that appeared to consist of two smaller groups linked at their tips. The double haploid rainbow trout lines and linkage map present a foundation for further genomic studies.

Journal

GeneticsGenetics Society of America

Published: Feb 1, 1998

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