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David Ferris: Arguments Against Quaker Slaveholding

David Ferris: Arguments Against Quaker Slaveholding David Ferris: Arguments Against Quaker Slaveholding1 Martha Paxson Grundy* David Ferris (1707­1779), a well-known early Wilmington Friend, was born into a Connecticut Congregationalist family in 1707. He attended Yale with the intention of becoming a minister, but kept stumbling over questions that the established church could not answer to his satisfaction. His spiritual seeking paralleled that of earlier Friends, and he sought out some of these religious people who were despised and feared by the colony's religious leaders. After much internal struggle he left Yale without getting his degree, ending his career opportunity in the Connecticut ministry, and made his way to Philadelphia in 1733. His spiritual life is detailed in his memoir.2 David and his growing family were among the early settlers of Wilmington, New Castle County, moving there in 1737. David opened a dry goods shop and also was an active member of Wilmington Meeting. After prolonged resistance, he finally submitted to divine promptings and offered vocal ministry in meeting for worship. He was acknowledged as a minister in 1757 at the age of 50. Curiously, he does not mention antislavery activity in his Memoir. His name is not often mentioned when Anthony Benezet and John http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quaker History Friends Historical Association

David Ferris: Arguments Against Quaker Slaveholding

Quaker History , Volume 103 (2) – Nov 5, 2014

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Publisher
Friends Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © Friends Historical Association
ISSN
1934-1504
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

David Ferris: Arguments Against Quaker Slaveholding1 Martha Paxson Grundy* David Ferris (1707­1779), a well-known early Wilmington Friend, was born into a Connecticut Congregationalist family in 1707. He attended Yale with the intention of becoming a minister, but kept stumbling over questions that the established church could not answer to his satisfaction. His spiritual seeking paralleled that of earlier Friends, and he sought out some of these religious people who were despised and feared by the colony's religious leaders. After much internal struggle he left Yale without getting his degree, ending his career opportunity in the Connecticut ministry, and made his way to Philadelphia in 1733. His spiritual life is detailed in his memoir.2 David and his growing family were among the early settlers of Wilmington, New Castle County, moving there in 1737. David opened a dry goods shop and also was an active member of Wilmington Meeting. After prolonged resistance, he finally submitted to divine promptings and offered vocal ministry in meeting for worship. He was acknowledged as a minister in 1757 at the age of 50. Curiously, he does not mention antislavery activity in his Memoir. His name is not often mentioned when Anthony Benezet and John

Journal

Quaker HistoryFriends Historical Association

Published: Nov 5, 2014

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