Conflicting Views on Foreign Missions: The Mission Board of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends in the 1920s

Conflicting Views on Foreign Missions: The Mission Board of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of... ConfliCting Views on oreign Missions Conflicting Views on fforeign Missions: 17 the Mission Board of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of friends in the 1920s tetsuko toda* Introduction in the United states, the student Volunteer Movement for foreign Missions was organized at the end of the 19th century, and foreign missions saw a peak in the 1910s. After wwi, however, people did not show much concern for foreign missions. Diminishing interest in religion can be pointed to, in the first instance. the absolute truth of the Bible had been challenged by the Higher Criticism and the theory of evolution. furthermore, the spread of entertainment, including movies and radio in the 1920s, led to a decline in the number of churchgoers. the moral certitude of Christianity, which had been the basis of foreign missions, was weakened because of the war between Christian countries. Cultural anthropology, a new academic field, had moreover suggested that Christianity could not be grafted easily onto a heathen culture since religion was based on the unique history of each country. thus, it seemed that the compelling causes to promote foreign missions had not been appreciated. in practical terms, donations for foreign missions had decreased and every foreign http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quaker History Friends Historical Association

Conflicting Views on Foreign Missions: The Mission Board of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends in the 1920s

Quaker History, Volume 100 (2) – Nov 18, 2011

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Publisher
Friends Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © Friends Historical Association
ISSN
1934-1504
Publisher site
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Abstract

ConfliCting Views on oreign Missions Conflicting Views on fforeign Missions: 17 the Mission Board of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of friends in the 1920s tetsuko toda* Introduction in the United states, the student Volunteer Movement for foreign Missions was organized at the end of the 19th century, and foreign missions saw a peak in the 1910s. After wwi, however, people did not show much concern for foreign missions. Diminishing interest in religion can be pointed to, in the first instance. the absolute truth of the Bible had been challenged by the Higher Criticism and the theory of evolution. furthermore, the spread of entertainment, including movies and radio in the 1920s, led to a decline in the number of churchgoers. the moral certitude of Christianity, which had been the basis of foreign missions, was weakened because of the war between Christian countries. Cultural anthropology, a new academic field, had moreover suggested that Christianity could not be grafted easily onto a heathen culture since religion was based on the unique history of each country. thus, it seemed that the compelling causes to promote foreign missions had not been appreciated. in practical terms, donations for foreign missions had decreased and every foreign

Journal

Quaker HistoryFriends Historical Association

Published: Nov 18, 2011

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