Briefer Notices

Briefer Notices By Henry J. Cadbury Millard S. Markle, formerly professor of biology at Earlham College, contributed to the Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science for 1959 (LXIX [I960], 243-246) a condensed article on "The Influence of Quakers on Science in Indiana." This influence has mostly come through Earlham College and its notable teachers like Joseph Moore, Allen Hole, and David Worth Dennis of the older days, and their successors. Here was erected the first astronomical observatory in the state in 1861 and here is the best college museum in the midwest. The same writer in the same per- iodical shares an article on the Joseph Moore Museum (LXVIII [1958], 311-315). "Science flourished at Earlham to a greater extent than in most church-related colleges because of the recognition from the beginning of the fact that there is no discord between scientific education and religion." This was a Quaker asset. Pennsylvania, 1817-1861" in the Journal of Mentd and Nervous Disease, CXXXI (I960), 277-290. It shows how, during the two periods more than a century ago, 1817-1834, 1834-1861, the Quaker emphasis upon non- A special chapter of Quaker history is rehearsed with special competence the Nineteenth Century: Patient Care at the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quaker History Friends Historical Association

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Publisher
Friends Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © Friends Historical Association
ISSN
1934-1504
Publisher site
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Abstract

By Henry J. Cadbury Millard S. Markle, formerly professor of biology at Earlham College, contributed to the Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science for 1959 (LXIX [I960], 243-246) a condensed article on "The Influence of Quakers on Science in Indiana." This influence has mostly come through Earlham College and its notable teachers like Joseph Moore, Allen Hole, and David Worth Dennis of the older days, and their successors. Here was erected the first astronomical observatory in the state in 1861 and here is the best college museum in the midwest. The same writer in the same per- iodical shares an article on the Joseph Moore Museum (LXVIII [1958], 311-315). "Science flourished at Earlham to a greater extent than in most church-related colleges because of the recognition from the beginning of the fact that there is no discord between scientific education and religion." This was a Quaker asset. Pennsylvania, 1817-1861" in the Journal of Mentd and Nervous Disease, CXXXI (I960), 277-290. It shows how, during the two periods more than a century ago, 1817-1834, 1834-1861, the Quaker emphasis upon non- A special chapter of Quaker history is rehearsed with special competence the Nineteenth Century: Patient Care at the

Journal

Quaker HistoryFriends Historical Association

Published: Apr 4, 1962

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