Replication and Narration: “Counterparts” as a Replicon of Joycean Narration

Replication and Narration: “Counterparts” as a Replicon of Joycean Narration Replication and Narration ``Counterparts'' as a Replicon of Joycean Narration M U R R AY M c A R T H U R As the long history of narrative theory since Plato and Aristotle attests, narration has always been a function of the replication of language. In the oral traditions of folktale and epic, narrators simultaneously composed and performed through replication of characters' speech, or mimesis, and their own speech, or diegesis, in Plato's and Aristotle's terms.1 Mimesis and diegesis were set within replications, or tokens, of tale-types in the folkloric tradition and type-scenes in the epic tradition.2 In terms of contemporary studies of replication, each type is constituted by the multiple repetitions of its tokens.3 My argument here is that, among all Joyce's texts, ``Counterparts,'' written at the beginning of his career, most clearly illustrates his understanding of the constitutive function of replication in narration. ``Counterparts'' displays the functions of replication at almost every level, from the constitutive play throughout the story on that title word, to Farrington's vocation as a scrivener or replicator of texts, to his avocation as a repetitive drinker and buyer of rounds of drinks, to his parallel avocations of mimesis or imitation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Joyce Studies Annual Fordham University Press

Replication and Narration: “Counterparts” as a Replicon of Joycean Narration

Joyce Studies Annual, Volume 2013 (1) – Dec 12, 2013

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Publisher
Fordham University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Fordham University Press
ISSN
1538-4241
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Abstract

Replication and Narration ``Counterparts'' as a Replicon of Joycean Narration M U R R AY M c A R T H U R As the long history of narrative theory since Plato and Aristotle attests, narration has always been a function of the replication of language. In the oral traditions of folktale and epic, narrators simultaneously composed and performed through replication of characters' speech, or mimesis, and their own speech, or diegesis, in Plato's and Aristotle's terms.1 Mimesis and diegesis were set within replications, or tokens, of tale-types in the folkloric tradition and type-scenes in the epic tradition.2 In terms of contemporary studies of replication, each type is constituted by the multiple repetitions of its tokens.3 My argument here is that, among all Joyce's texts, ``Counterparts,'' written at the beginning of his career, most clearly illustrates his understanding of the constitutive function of replication in narration. ``Counterparts'' displays the functions of replication at almost every level, from the constitutive play throughout the story on that title word, to Farrington's vocation as a scrivener or replicator of texts, to his avocation as a repetitive drinker and buyer of rounds of drinks, to his parallel avocations of mimesis or imitation

Journal

Joyce Studies AnnualFordham University Press

Published: Dec 12, 2013

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