Irish Unionism, North of Ireland Protestantism, and the Home Rule Question in Joyce’s Dubliners

Irish Unionism, North of Ireland Protestantism, and the Home Rule Question in Joyce’s Dubliners RICHARD RANKIN RUSSELL He is not an artist he says. He is interesting himself in politics--in which he says [he has] original ideas. --Stanislaus Joyce, writing about his brother James in 19031 Innuendo of home rule. --Leopold Bloom (U 7.150) JOYCE, THE POLITICS OF UNIONISM, AND NORTHERN PROTESTANTISM Stanislaus Joyce's remark in 1903 sets the tone for this essay, noting as it does Joyce's great interest in politics at the time. So does Joseph Kelly's contention in 1998 that ``[b]etween 1904 and 1907, when he was writing Dubliners and Stephen Hero, Joyce was a political writer . . .''2 Kelly takes pains to establish Joyce's politics in the early 1900s in order to recover him as a realist writer; I will focus on Joyce's politics to suggest how particular fictional Protestant characters from the North of Ireland in Dubliners are analogs for their real-life counterparts (the invocation of a title from Joyce's story collection is purposeful) who would block Home Rule in the years leading up to the Home Rule crisis in 1912­14. Understanding his work in the context of the North of Ireland, however, remains an unfinished (even barely started) endeavor for Joyce criticism. One early intervention http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Joyce Studies Annual Fordham University Press

Irish Unionism, North of Ireland Protestantism, and the Home Rule Question in Joyce’s Dubliners

Joyce Studies Annual, Volume 2013 (1) – Dec 12, 2013

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Fordham University Press
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Copyright © Fordham University Press
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1538-4241
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Abstract

RICHARD RANKIN RUSSELL He is not an artist he says. He is interesting himself in politics--in which he says [he has] original ideas. --Stanislaus Joyce, writing about his brother James in 19031 Innuendo of home rule. --Leopold Bloom (U 7.150) JOYCE, THE POLITICS OF UNIONISM, AND NORTHERN PROTESTANTISM Stanislaus Joyce's remark in 1903 sets the tone for this essay, noting as it does Joyce's great interest in politics at the time. So does Joseph Kelly's contention in 1998 that ``[b]etween 1904 and 1907, when he was writing Dubliners and Stephen Hero, Joyce was a political writer . . .''2 Kelly takes pains to establish Joyce's politics in the early 1900s in order to recover him as a realist writer; I will focus on Joyce's politics to suggest how particular fictional Protestant characters from the North of Ireland in Dubliners are analogs for their real-life counterparts (the invocation of a title from Joyce's story collection is purposeful) who would block Home Rule in the years leading up to the Home Rule crisis in 1912­14. Understanding his work in the context of the North of Ireland, however, remains an unfinished (even barely started) endeavor for Joyce criticism. One early intervention

Journal

Joyce Studies AnnualFordham University Press

Published: Dec 12, 2013

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