Organizational culture as a moderator between affective commitment and job satisfaction

Organizational culture as a moderator between affective commitment and job satisfaction PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of organizational culture in affective commitment and job satisfaction relationship.Design/methodology/approachResponses were collected from 712 employees working in nine different Indian central public sector enterprises /state-owned enterprises (SOEs) by using a questionnaire-based survey. Theoretical analysis is based on social exchange theory and managerial grid theory. Data were analyzed by using partial least squares structural equation modeling.FindingsThe establishment of organizational culture as a moderator in Indian organizations is unique. This study has utilized data from employees working in different departments of organizations to provide unbiased responses. The results demonstrate that impact of affective commitment on employees’ job satisfaction is moderated by supportive and innovative cultures. Additionally, this research also proves that bureaucratic culture does not play a crucial role in moderating the relationship between organizational commitment and employees’ job satisfaction.Research limitations/implicationsResults are relevant to top-level and middle-level management in which people are involved in the governance of the organization, both directly and indirectly. There should be fixed working hours and optimum time management. Due to growing pressure, few employees who have personal obligations toward their families, such as nursing mothers and stressed individuals, should be provided with flexible working hours. In this way, culture can become supportive to cater to different needs of employees.Originality/valueTill date, organizational culture as moderator has received very less attention in India. The establishment of organizational culture as a moderator in Indian SOEs is unique. The results add to the growing literature of commitment from non-western context as this study is based on Indian samples. This study has utilized data from employees working in different departments of organizations to provide unbiased responses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Public Sector Management Emerald Publishing

Organizational culture as a moderator between affective commitment and job satisfaction

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Publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0951-3558
D.O.I.
10.1108/IJPSM-03-2017-0078
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of organizational culture in affective commitment and job satisfaction relationship.Design/methodology/approachResponses were collected from 712 employees working in nine different Indian central public sector enterprises /state-owned enterprises (SOEs) by using a questionnaire-based survey. Theoretical analysis is based on social exchange theory and managerial grid theory. Data were analyzed by using partial least squares structural equation modeling.FindingsThe establishment of organizational culture as a moderator in Indian organizations is unique. This study has utilized data from employees working in different departments of organizations to provide unbiased responses. The results demonstrate that impact of affective commitment on employees’ job satisfaction is moderated by supportive and innovative cultures. Additionally, this research also proves that bureaucratic culture does not play a crucial role in moderating the relationship between organizational commitment and employees’ job satisfaction.Research limitations/implicationsResults are relevant to top-level and middle-level management in which people are involved in the governance of the organization, both directly and indirectly. There should be fixed working hours and optimum time management. Due to growing pressure, few employees who have personal obligations toward their families, such as nursing mothers and stressed individuals, should be provided with flexible working hours. In this way, culture can become supportive to cater to different needs of employees.Originality/valueTill date, organizational culture as moderator has received very less attention in India. The establishment of organizational culture as a moderator in Indian SOEs is unique. The results add to the growing literature of commitment from non-western context as this study is based on Indian samples. This study has utilized data from employees working in different departments of organizations to provide unbiased responses.

Journal

International Journal of Public Sector ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 5, 2018

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