Your lubrication problem

Your lubrication problem Readers are invited to submit their problems for solution. Replies to queries are wel­ comed by competent authorities whose names or nommes-de-plumes may be used if they wish but the names and addresses of all correspondents must accompany all queries or answers. return pipe must be used where local conditions QUESTION : We are contemplating the setting up allow. The lay-out of the machine tools in the of a centralized system for dealing with supply of machine shop will necessarily affect the detail design soluble cutting oil to about thirty capstan lathes in of the coolant supply system, but using the system our machine shop. At present each machine has its described as a basis, successful operation can be own supply in the usual manner. We would appre­ obtained. (Production Engineer, Loughborough). ciate readers views and experiences of actual systems. I s it easy to incorporate a method for cutting off QUESTION : One of the biggest problems for the certain rows of machines should these require to use motorist and for the transport contractor too, is a different grade of cutting oil ? Mixing tanks and having to grease their vehicles. This work is rarely filters must be included in the system. (G.H.S , done according to correct schedule and life of bear­ London, E.C.). ings must suffer. It would be thought that systems of mechanical lubrication would have become more ANSWER : A common supply of soluble oil emul­ popular. From time to time several of these have sion to a group of machines can be arranged as shown appeared on the market for use on private cars and in the enclosed drawing. The coolant is mixed in also commercial vehicles, but they never seem to tan k 1, with water supplied from feed 2. The tank have become popular. I would have thought that should contain a mechanical stirrer 3, to facilitate the demand for them was so great that manufacturers emulsification of the soluble oil. The mixed emul­ would have expended any amount of time and money sion is then pumped through filter 4 to a gravity feed to perfect them, if they were not fool-proof. Why tan k 6 by means of a suction pump 5. It is then have they not done so?—(R.L., Newcastle-on-Tyne). gravity fed to the individual machine tools through ANSWER : The above query is capable of im­ supply pipes. The used coolant is returned through mediate answer as Tecalemit Ltd. have been market­ a return pipe, which terminates in a separate com­ ing successful central lubrication equipment for the partment of the main tank 7, where swarf and impurities are deposited. This compartment should heavier type of transport and public service vehicles contain provisions for easy cleaning and it is con­ for some years. nected to the main mixing tank so tha t the returned The latest type of equipment comprises a pump and cleaned coolant can be re-circulated. An over­ driven from a belt pulley on the propeller shaft so flow pipe 8, which returns surplus coolant to the that the oil feed is strictly proportionate to the mile­ mixing tank can be fitted to the gravity feed tank. age run. The pump itself is composed of up to about Individual machines can be isolated from the 40 separate pumping units, each one feeding a common supply by means of valves and can then be different bearing through a rust proof steel pipe. provided with special cutting fluids if the need arises. The name given to this unit is "Syndromic" and it Depending on the lay-out of the machine shop, a appears to be fool-proof since it is totally enclosed number of valves placed in the pipe lines will enable and runs in oil. ("Transport", Chiswick). the isolation of entire banks of machines. QUESTION : We run a large fleet of cars for private hire. What are readers experiences regard­ ing lubrication of the road springs ? For some years 1 have discontinued lubricating my springs since I used to break more leaves than could be replaced during war time. Breakages have been very few since leaving them dry. But squeaks certainly do occur and are not too good for private hire work.— (R., Hendon). ANSWER : Some vehicle manufacturers advise that springs be not lubricated at all, the idea being that Although a group supply such as that described is the corrosion creates friction which puts a brake on of considerable economic value, it has inherent weak­ the flexibility of the springs. This is claimed to nesses which have to be guarded against. Failure of minimise spring breakage by excessive flexing. the pump would paralyse the operation of the whole Obviously, without a lubricant, squeaks are bound to group of machines as would also a blockage of the occur, hence a lubricant is called for which will pre­ pipes. It may therefore be advisable to install an vent rust and, by its tackiness, will prevent excessive auxiliary pump in the system, which could be used in flexing. This property is found in graphite products case of failure of the main pump. To prevent in fairly general use among large fleet operators.— blockage of the pipes, they should have an adequate (T.R. Parry, Managing Director, T.R. Parry & Co. gradient, sharp bends should be avoided and they Ltd.). should be easily accessible. An open, channel type Scientific LUBRICATION 2 2 March, 1949 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Your lubrication problem

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, Volume 1 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1949

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb051996
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Readers are invited to submit their problems for solution. Replies to queries are wel­ comed by competent authorities whose names or nommes-de-plumes may be used if they wish but the names and addresses of all correspondents must accompany all queries or answers. return pipe must be used where local conditions QUESTION : We are contemplating the setting up allow. The lay-out of the machine tools in the of a centralized system for dealing with supply of machine shop will necessarily affect the detail design soluble cutting oil to about thirty capstan lathes in of the coolant supply system, but using the system our machine shop. At present each machine has its described as a basis, successful operation can be own supply in the usual manner. We would appre­ obtained. (Production Engineer, Loughborough). ciate readers views and experiences of actual systems. I s it easy to incorporate a method for cutting off QUESTION : One of the biggest problems for the certain rows of machines should these require to use motorist and for the transport contractor too, is a different grade of cutting oil ? Mixing tanks and having to grease their vehicles. This work is rarely filters must be included in the system. (G.H.S , done according to correct schedule and life of bear­ London, E.C.). ings must suffer. It would be thought that systems of mechanical lubrication would have become more ANSWER : A common supply of soluble oil emul­ popular. From time to time several of these have sion to a group of machines can be arranged as shown appeared on the market for use on private cars and in the enclosed drawing. The coolant is mixed in also commercial vehicles, but they never seem to tan k 1, with water supplied from feed 2. The tank have become popular. I would have thought that should contain a mechanical stirrer 3, to facilitate the demand for them was so great that manufacturers emulsification of the soluble oil. The mixed emul­ would have expended any amount of time and money sion is then pumped through filter 4 to a gravity feed to perfect them, if they were not fool-proof. Why tan k 6 by means of a suction pump 5. It is then have they not done so?—(R.L., Newcastle-on-Tyne). gravity fed to the individual machine tools through ANSWER : The above query is capable of im­ supply pipes. The used coolant is returned through mediate answer as Tecalemit Ltd. have been market­ a return pipe, which terminates in a separate com­ ing successful central lubrication equipment for the partment of the main tank 7, where swarf and impurities are deposited. This compartment should heavier type of transport and public service vehicles contain provisions for easy cleaning and it is con­ for some years. nected to the main mixing tank so tha t the returned The latest type of equipment comprises a pump and cleaned coolant can be re-circulated. An over­ driven from a belt pulley on the propeller shaft so flow pipe 8, which returns surplus coolant to the that the oil feed is strictly proportionate to the mile­ mixing tank can be fitted to the gravity feed tank. age run. The pump itself is composed of up to about Individual machines can be isolated from the 40 separate pumping units, each one feeding a common supply by means of valves and can then be different bearing through a rust proof steel pipe. provided with special cutting fluids if the need arises. The name given to this unit is "Syndromic" and it Depending on the lay-out of the machine shop, a appears to be fool-proof since it is totally enclosed number of valves placed in the pipe lines will enable and runs in oil. ("Transport", Chiswick). the isolation of entire banks of machines. QUESTION : We run a large fleet of cars for private hire. What are readers experiences regard­ ing lubrication of the road springs ? For some years 1 have discontinued lubricating my springs since I used to break more leaves than could be replaced during war time. Breakages have been very few since leaving them dry. But squeaks certainly do occur and are not too good for private hire work.— (R., Hendon). ANSWER : Some vehicle manufacturers advise that springs be not lubricated at all, the idea being that Although a group supply such as that described is the corrosion creates friction which puts a brake on of considerable economic value, it has inherent weak­ the flexibility of the springs. This is claimed to nesses which have to be guarded against. Failure of minimise spring breakage by excessive flexing. the pump would paralyse the operation of the whole Obviously, without a lubricant, squeaks are bound to group of machines as would also a blockage of the occur, hence a lubricant is called for which will pre­ pipes. It may therefore be advisable to install an vent rust and, by its tackiness, will prevent excessive auxiliary pump in the system, which could be used in flexing. This property is found in graphite products case of failure of the main pump. To prevent in fairly general use among large fleet operators.— blockage of the pipes, they should have an adequate (T.R. Parry, Managing Director, T.R. Parry & Co. gradient, sharp bends should be avoided and they Ltd.). should be easily accessible. An open, channel type Scientific LUBRICATION 2 2 March, 1949

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1949

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