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Your life, your choice

Your life, your choice Purpose – With the introduction of the personalisation agenda (Department of Health, 2008) within social care (and health), this paper aims to discursively explore two themes: improving the lives of people with acquired brain injury through the introduction of more personalised services and support; and the impact of the culture shift on Headway Cambridgeshire as a service provider. Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents examples to illustrate how it is possible to plan in a way that is broad enough to meet the needs of the majority whilst being flexible enough to deal with differing individualised circumstances. Findings – The paper highlights the challenges faced by individuals and service provider organisations when introducing personalised services and suggests some approaches that can be taken to overcome them. Practical implications – Recommendations for good practice in personalised services. Originality/value – This paper sets out a framework for organisations working with people with acquired brain injury in a social care setting in the community and how the principles embodied by the personalisation agenda can be introduced into existing service provision. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

Your life, your choice

Social Care and Neurodisability , Volume 2 (3): 8 – Aug 15, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/20420911111172710
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – With the introduction of the personalisation agenda (Department of Health, 2008) within social care (and health), this paper aims to discursively explore two themes: improving the lives of people with acquired brain injury through the introduction of more personalised services and support; and the impact of the culture shift on Headway Cambridgeshire as a service provider. Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents examples to illustrate how it is possible to plan in a way that is broad enough to meet the needs of the majority whilst being flexible enough to deal with differing individualised circumstances. Findings – The paper highlights the challenges faced by individuals and service provider organisations when introducing personalised services and suggests some approaches that can be taken to overcome them. Practical implications – Recommendations for good practice in personalised services. Originality/value – This paper sets out a framework for organisations working with people with acquired brain injury in a social care setting in the community and how the principles embodied by the personalisation agenda can be introduced into existing service provision.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 15, 2011

Keywords: Acquired brain injury; Personalisation; Self‐directed support; Service provider; Social services; Neurology

References