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Workplace learning as a linchpin of Europe's lifelong learning policy An examination of national policies with particular reference to people with long‐term mental illness

Workplace learning as a linchpin of Europe's lifelong learning policy An examination of national... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which workplace learning forms a building block in national lifelong learning policies by obtaining evidence, first‐hand, from mental health practitioners about their perceptions of their individual country's national lifelong learning policy and, in particular, its application to adults with long‐term mental illness. Design/methodology/approach – Text analysis: review of relevant literature and European Union policy documents and survey questionnaire. Findings – It is evident that the use of workplace learning as a linchpin in national strategies for lifelong learning in Denmark and France is clear and empirically supported. Research limitations/implications – Comparative evidence of evaluations of impact and effectiveness of workplace lifelong learning provision in the two countries examined is patchy at best raising further questions about the “value” of investments in both workplace learning and lifelong learning in these countries. Practical implications – There is a risk that by focusing on jobs and workplace learning, the specific needs and desires of people with mental illness who, in the main, might want to engage in lifelong learning for reasons other than jobs and workplace learning, may end up being disadvantaged as their (non‐economic) needs go unmet. Originality/value – Until now there has been little or no attempt to examine Europe's conception of lifelong learning policy and its application to a multiple disadvantaged group such as mental health service users. This is a major attempt to remedy current dearth of research in the area. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning Emerald Publishing

Workplace learning as a linchpin of Europe's lifelong learning policy An examination of national policies with particular reference to people with long‐term mental illness

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-3896
DOI
10.1108/HESWBL-04-2011-0025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which workplace learning forms a building block in national lifelong learning policies by obtaining evidence, first‐hand, from mental health practitioners about their perceptions of their individual country's national lifelong learning policy and, in particular, its application to adults with long‐term mental illness. Design/methodology/approach – Text analysis: review of relevant literature and European Union policy documents and survey questionnaire. Findings – It is evident that the use of workplace learning as a linchpin in national strategies for lifelong learning in Denmark and France is clear and empirically supported. Research limitations/implications – Comparative evidence of evaluations of impact and effectiveness of workplace lifelong learning provision in the two countries examined is patchy at best raising further questions about the “value” of investments in both workplace learning and lifelong learning in these countries. Practical implications – There is a risk that by focusing on jobs and workplace learning, the specific needs and desires of people with mental illness who, in the main, might want to engage in lifelong learning for reasons other than jobs and workplace learning, may end up being disadvantaged as their (non‐economic) needs go unmet. Originality/value – Until now there has been little or no attempt to examine Europe's conception of lifelong learning policy and its application to a multiple disadvantaged group such as mental health service users. This is a major attempt to remedy current dearth of research in the area.

Journal

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based LearningEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 27, 2013

Keywords: Social capital; Workplace; Workplace learning; EMILIA; European Union; Lifelong learning; Mental health service users; Mental health practitioners; EU policy; Work and well‐being; Cultural capital

References