Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Work in progress: the progression of competence-based employability

Work in progress: the progression of competence-based employability Employability and its components have received a lot of attention from scholars and practitioners. However, little is known about the interrelations between these different components of employability and how employees progress within their employability trajectories. Therefore, a model of such progression was constructed and tested using Van der Heijde and Van der Heijden’s (2006) employability measurement instrument. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approachThe propositions were tested empirically by applying a Rasch model using a sample of 167 Austrian business consultants.FindingsThe findings lend some support for the hypothesized progression model of employability. Specifically, the items measuring occupational expertise are largely located in the group of items that were relatively likely to be endorsed. Also, the items of personal flexibility and anticipation and optimization were, in general, less likely to be endorsed than the items of occupational expertise.Research limitations/implicationsThe major thrust of this paper is a theoretical one. However, the empirical demonstration tentatively supports the proposed model, which implies that further, more robust longitudinal research in this direction may be a worthwhile endeavor.Practical implicationsBy understanding which competences are important at which stage or across which stages of an individual’s career, career advisors and human resource management professionals can give more targeted advice concerning career management practices.Originality/valueThe present study contributes to the literature by investigating how employees may make progress within their employability trajectories. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Career Development International Emerald Publishing

Work in progress: the progression of competence-based employability

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/work-in-progress-the-progression-of-competence-based-employability-35ZDBEMONE
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1362-0436
DOI
10.1108/cdi-06-2017-0098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Employability and its components have received a lot of attention from scholars and practitioners. However, little is known about the interrelations between these different components of employability and how employees progress within their employability trajectories. Therefore, a model of such progression was constructed and tested using Van der Heijde and Van der Heijden’s (2006) employability measurement instrument. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approachThe propositions were tested empirically by applying a Rasch model using a sample of 167 Austrian business consultants.FindingsThe findings lend some support for the hypothesized progression model of employability. Specifically, the items measuring occupational expertise are largely located in the group of items that were relatively likely to be endorsed. Also, the items of personal flexibility and anticipation and optimization were, in general, less likely to be endorsed than the items of occupational expertise.Research limitations/implicationsThe major thrust of this paper is a theoretical one. However, the empirical demonstration tentatively supports the proposed model, which implies that further, more robust longitudinal research in this direction may be a worthwhile endeavor.Practical implicationsBy understanding which competences are important at which stage or across which stages of an individual’s career, career advisors and human resource management professionals can give more targeted advice concerning career management practices.Originality/valueThe present study contributes to the literature by investigating how employees may make progress within their employability trajectories.

Journal

Career Development InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: May 14, 2018

Keywords: Career development; Rasch analysis; Competence-based employability

References