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Wired in Whitehall: a survey of Internet and intranet use in government

Wired in Whitehall: a survey of Internet and intranet use in government A questionnaire survey giving details of internet and intranet use in 23 government departments. The survey found considerable increased access to the World Wide Web on the previous survey and the widespread existence, but erratic implementation, of web use polices. Training in Internet searching was becoming a significant activity for many libraries. There was little involvement by library staff in departmental websites, with considerable use being made of external consultants when designing, setting up and restructuring sites. Email was proving to be a standard tool within government. Intranets were becoming more prevalent and there was broad recognition of the relevance of information management skills to the development and management of intranets. There were unrealistic expectations of intranets and a widespread belief that intranets are not used to their full potential. However, there was universal agreement that intranets are a very positive additions to organisations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aslib Proceedings: New Information Perspectives Emerald Publishing

Wired in Whitehall: a survey of Internet and intranet use in government

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0001-253X
DOI
10.1108/EUM0000000007035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A questionnaire survey giving details of internet and intranet use in 23 government departments. The survey found considerable increased access to the World Wide Web on the previous survey and the widespread existence, but erratic implementation, of web use polices. Training in Internet searching was becoming a significant activity for many libraries. There was little involvement by library staff in departmental websites, with considerable use being made of external consultants when designing, setting up and restructuring sites. Email was proving to be a standard tool within government. Intranets were becoming more prevalent and there was broad recognition of the relevance of information management skills to the development and management of intranets. There were unrealistic expectations of intranets and a widespread belief that intranets are not used to their full potential. However, there was universal agreement that intranets are a very positive additions to organisations.

Journal

Aslib Proceedings: New Information PerspectivesEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 2001

Keywords: Internet; Electronic mail; Questionnaire

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