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Why You Tryna Silence Her Body The Role of Education in Shaping the Black Female Body

Why You Tryna Silence Her Body The Role of Education in Shaping the Black Female Body Artistic expression is a vessel to define, refine, understand and become. Poetry and dance are tongues and instinctive expressions of my thoughts, feelings, and analyses. Thus, my embodiment, challenges and responses to social inequities often merge in these forms. Yet, artistic expression can be seen as trivial when used as method to illustrate social inequities. Drawing on the works of feminists of color, I offer poetry and dance as a queered performance to name and resist my embodiment of racism, sexism, and heteropatriarchy. Using these methods with my body as the site of struggle and potential, this piece talks back to standards of analysis and demands accountability be taken for the marking, sculpting and appraisal of my black female body. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qualitative Research Journal Emerald Publishing

Why You Tryna Silence Her Body The Role of Education in Shaping the Black Female Body

Qualitative Research Journal , Volume 11 (2): 8 – Aug 3, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1443-9883
DOI
10.3316/QRJ1102102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artistic expression is a vessel to define, refine, understand and become. Poetry and dance are tongues and instinctive expressions of my thoughts, feelings, and analyses. Thus, my embodiment, challenges and responses to social inequities often merge in these forms. Yet, artistic expression can be seen as trivial when used as method to illustrate social inequities. Drawing on the works of feminists of color, I offer poetry and dance as a queered performance to name and resist my embodiment of racism, sexism, and heteropatriarchy. Using these methods with my body as the site of struggle and potential, this piece talks back to standards of analysis and demands accountability be taken for the marking, sculpting and appraisal of my black female body.

Journal

Qualitative Research JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 3, 2011

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