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Why good management ideas fail: the neglected power of organizational culture

Why good management ideas fail: the neglected power of organizational culture Why do some management ideas take root and remain viable and others wither and die? This article offers four fundamental reasons: all organizations are basically living, social organisms; culture is more powerful than anything else in the organization; system‐focused interventions work, component‐centered interventions usually do not; interventions clearly tied to business strategy work, interventions not clearly tied to business strategy do not. The author describes research that points to four core cultures: control, based on a military system, with power as the primary motive; collaboration, emerging from the family and/or athletic team system, in which the underlying motive is affiliation; competence, derived from the university system, with the fundamental motive of achievement; and cultivation, growing from religious system(s) and motivated by growth or self‐actualization. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Strategy & Leadership Emerald Publishing

Why good management ideas fail: the neglected power of organizational culture

Strategy & Leadership , Volume 28 (1): 6 – Feb 1, 2000

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References (13)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1087-8572
DOI
10.1108/10878570010336001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Why do some management ideas take root and remain viable and others wither and die? This article offers four fundamental reasons: all organizations are basically living, social organisms; culture is more powerful than anything else in the organization; system‐focused interventions work, component‐centered interventions usually do not; interventions clearly tied to business strategy work, interventions not clearly tied to business strategy do not. The author describes research that points to four core cultures: control, based on a military system, with power as the primary motive; collaboration, emerging from the family and/or athletic team system, in which the underlying motive is affiliation; competence, derived from the university system, with the fundamental motive of achievement; and cultivation, growing from religious system(s) and motivated by growth or self‐actualization.

Journal

Strategy & LeadershipEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 2000

Keywords: Organizational change; Corporate culture; Leadership

There are no references for this article.