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Who Should Decide Key Areas for Participation

Who Should Decide Key Areas for Participation Research is reported which was conducted using a randomly selectedWestern Australian community sample and involved measuring therespondents preferred style of leadership. The results suggest thatpeople do not think employees should participate in decisions which canlead to possible conflict between themselves and fellow workers. Thestudy also identified certain background factors which influence therespondents ideal leadership style. For instance, women appeared toprefer a more democratic style than their male colleagues, being amember of a trade union seemed to influence a greater preference fornonmanagerial workers and being in the workforce also tended toincrease a preference for a democratic style. The results, therefore,suggest that the introduction of participative management systems shouldbe piecemeal rather than an involvement in all decisions by all membersof the enterprise and this may well differ between organisations. Thusmanagers of organisations, if they wish to introduce a participativemanagerial process, will have to consider the type of decisions to bemade, the gender composition of the workforce and the union penetrationof the workforce. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leadership & Organization Development Journal Emerald Publishing

Who Should Decide Key Areas for Participation

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References (4)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0143-7739
DOI
10.1108/01437739110140207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research is reported which was conducted using a randomly selectedWestern Australian community sample and involved measuring therespondents preferred style of leadership. The results suggest thatpeople do not think employees should participate in decisions which canlead to possible conflict between themselves and fellow workers. Thestudy also identified certain background factors which influence therespondents ideal leadership style. For instance, women appeared toprefer a more democratic style than their male colleagues, being amember of a trade union seemed to influence a greater preference fornonmanagerial workers and being in the workforce also tended toincrease a preference for a democratic style. The results, therefore,suggest that the introduction of participative management systems shouldbe piecemeal rather than an involvement in all decisions by all membersof the enterprise and this may well differ between organisations. Thusmanagers of organisations, if they wish to introduce a participativemanagerial process, will have to consider the type of decisions to bemade, the gender composition of the workforce and the union penetrationof the workforce.

Journal

Leadership & Organization Development JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1991

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