Who is responsible for my workaholism: me, my parents or my workplace?

Who is responsible for my workaholism: me, my parents or my workplace? Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of workaholism, the factors driving it and its impact on executives and their companies. Design/methodology/approach – This paper draws on the author’s first-hand experience of working in this area. Findings – It identifies types of workaholism among managers. Explains that the positive side is individuals who are self-reliant, well-organized, have high standards and feel fulfillment when work is completed to a high standard and on time. The negative side is feelings of anxiety and physical and mental exhaustion, being restless and mentally preoccupied with work. Practical implications – It highlights the roles of parental upbringing, personal values and workplace culture and practices as drivers of workaholism. Being workaholic may lead to a rewarding career but can harm health and work-life balance. Social implications – It suggests that, by understanding the nature of workaholism, individuals and organizations can take corrective measures. Originality/value – It takes a psychological approach to understanding and managing workaholism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Management International Digest Emerald Publishing

Who is responsible for my workaholism: me, my parents or my workplace?

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0967-0734
DOI
10.1108/HRMID-07-2014-0100
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of workaholism, the factors driving it and its impact on executives and their companies. Design/methodology/approach – This paper draws on the author’s first-hand experience of working in this area. Findings – It identifies types of workaholism among managers. Explains that the positive side is individuals who are self-reliant, well-organized, have high standards and feel fulfillment when work is completed to a high standard and on time. The negative side is feelings of anxiety and physical and mental exhaustion, being restless and mentally preoccupied with work. Practical implications – It highlights the roles of parental upbringing, personal values and workplace culture and practices as drivers of workaholism. Being workaholic may lead to a rewarding career but can harm health and work-life balance. Social implications – It suggests that, by understanding the nature of workaholism, individuals and organizations can take corrective measures. Originality/value – It takes a psychological approach to understanding and managing workaholism.

Journal

Human Resource Management International DigestEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 8, 2014

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