Which academic subjects have most online impact? A pilot study and a new classification process

Which academic subjects have most online impact? A pilot study and a new classification process The use of the Web by academic researchers is discipline‐dependent and highly variable. It is increasingly central for sharing information, disseminating results and publicising research projects. This pilot study seeks to identify the subjects that have the most impact on the Web, and look for national differences in online subject visibility. The highest impact sites were from computing, but there were major national differences in the impact of engineering and technology sites. Another difference was that Taiwan had more high impact non‐academic sites hosted by universities. As a pilot study, the classification process itself was also investigated and the problems of applying subject classification to academic Web sites discussed. The study draws out a number of issues in this regard, having no simple solutions and point to the need to interpret the results with caution. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Online Information Review Emerald Publishing

Which academic subjects have most online impact? A pilot study and a new classification process

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1468-4527
DOI
10.1108/14684520310502298
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The use of the Web by academic researchers is discipline‐dependent and highly variable. It is increasingly central for sharing information, disseminating results and publicising research projects. This pilot study seeks to identify the subjects that have the most impact on the Web, and look for national differences in online subject visibility. The highest impact sites were from computing, but there were major national differences in the impact of engineering and technology sites. Another difference was that Taiwan had more high impact non‐academic sites hosted by universities. As a pilot study, the classification process itself was also investigated and the problems of applying subject classification to academic Web sites discussed. The study draws out a number of issues in this regard, having no simple solutions and point to the need to interpret the results with caution.

Journal

Online Information ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 2003

Keywords: Worldwide Web; Subject cataloguing; Classification; Universities

References

  • The calculation of Web impact factors
    Ingwersen, P.
  • Authoritative sources in a hyperlinked environment
    Kleinberg, J.

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