Where good ERP implementations go bad: a case for continuity

Where good ERP implementations go bad: a case for continuity Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify and examine the concerns of administrative and clerical employees towards a web‐based business system and associated training which were not identified either before or during an enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation. Post‐implementation analyses revealed that while an implementation can be deemed a success immediately following go‐live dates, long‐term planning is essential to maintain change management continuity for administrators and employees. Design/methodology/approach – The stages of concern component of the concerns‐based adoption model offered a method of analysis of the Dallas, Texas, Independent School District's employees to identify the perceptions and levels of acceptance of the users in regards to the implementation of an ERP system in a public school district. Findings – The findings for the research questions assisted in interpreting and categorizing the responses to the open‐ended portion of the stages of concern questionnaire; and providing recommended guidelines for future ERP implementations in similar environments. Practical implications – The paper shows how leaders in an organization must understand the employees' perceptions of the changes taking place in an ERP implementation and post‐implementation. Based on the findings, a summary, conclusion, and recommendations for further research are provided to assist K‐12 districts in planning for ERP implementations. Originality/value – The significance of this study encompasses the impact of the integration of new technology with various associated people, processes, and systems. Understanding the impact of such potentially significant change by measuring a user community's overall perception and level of acceptance is a key component in providing guidance for future implementations in similar organizational and institutional environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Business Process Management Journal Emerald Publishing

Where good ERP implementations go bad: a case for continuity

Business Process Management Journal, Volume 14 (3): 11 – Jun 6, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1463-7154
DOI
10.1108/14637150810876661
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify and examine the concerns of administrative and clerical employees towards a web‐based business system and associated training which were not identified either before or during an enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation. Post‐implementation analyses revealed that while an implementation can be deemed a success immediately following go‐live dates, long‐term planning is essential to maintain change management continuity for administrators and employees. Design/methodology/approach – The stages of concern component of the concerns‐based adoption model offered a method of analysis of the Dallas, Texas, Independent School District's employees to identify the perceptions and levels of acceptance of the users in regards to the implementation of an ERP system in a public school district. Findings – The findings for the research questions assisted in interpreting and categorizing the responses to the open‐ended portion of the stages of concern questionnaire; and providing recommended guidelines for future ERP implementations in similar environments. Practical implications – The paper shows how leaders in an organization must understand the employees' perceptions of the changes taking place in an ERP implementation and post‐implementation. Based on the findings, a summary, conclusion, and recommendations for further research are provided to assist K‐12 districts in planning for ERP implementations. Originality/value – The significance of this study encompasses the impact of the integration of new technology with various associated people, processes, and systems. Understanding the impact of such potentially significant change by measuring a user community's overall perception and level of acceptance is a key component in providing guidance for future implementations in similar organizational and institutional environments.

Journal

Business Process Management JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 6, 2008

Keywords: Resource management; Change management; Technology‐led strategy

References

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